Press Room

Welcome to the Nevada Museum of Art Online Press Office. Here you will find the latest press releases on Museum exhibitions, programs, and events, as well as recent news announcements and general information. To receive regular press releases and request preview invitations please register on the Press Mailing List.

Please direct questions or high-resolution image requests to Rachel Milon, Director of Communications and Marketing at 775.329.3333 ex. 228 or .

Current Press Releases

  • NEVADA MUSEUM OF ART RECIPIENT OF PRESTIGIOUS NATIONAL BOOK AWARD FOR THE PUBLICATION "ALTERED LANDSCAPE: PHOTOGRAPHS OF A CHANGING ENVIRONMENT"



    » Press Release

    May 3, 2012 - The America Association of Museums has awarded the Nevada Museum of Art its coveted 2012 Frances Smyth-Ravenel Prize for Excellence in Publication Design for the Museum’s publication Altered Landscape: Photographs of a Changing Environment. This grand prize award is bestowed upon only one museum in the United States each year. The deluxe 288-page publication, published by Skira Rizzoli, New York, highlights more than 150 photographic works, by more than 100 artists, from the Museum’s permanent photography collection of the same name. Past winners of the Frances Smyth-Ravenel Prize for Excellence in Publication Design include the International Center of Photography, NY; the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, NY; and the Smithsonian American Art Museum, Washington DC.

    “This publication has garnered praise and enthusiasm from writers, artists, critics and art lovers alike. The receipt of AAM’s grand prize further confirms that both the book and collection are powerful and thought-provoking examinations of human impacts on our global environment,” commented David B. Walker, Executive Director | CEO, Nevada Museum of Art. “The Museum is truly honored to be selected for recognition by the AAM and receive this prestigious award.”

    A keystone of the Museum’s thematic focus on art and environment, the Altered Landscape: Photographs of a Changing Environment publication examines the many ways that humans interact with natural and built environments. Designed by Brad Bartlett of Brad Bartlett Design, Los Angeles, the book is edited and authored by Ann M. Wolfe, Curator of Exhibitions and Collections at the Nevada Museum of Art, and features essays by Wolfe; Geoff Manaugh, author of BLDGBLOG and Contributing Editor for Wired UK; Lucy Lippard, cultural critic; WJT Mitchell, editor, scholar and theorist of media, visual art, and literature, and Professor of English and Art History, University of Chicago.

    “The photographs in the Altered Landscape are drawn from the Museum’s signature permanent collection: the Carol Franc Buck Altered Landscape Photography Collection,” commented Wolfe. “It is gratifying to know that this collection of images—revealing how humans have marked, mined, toured, tested, and developed landscapes over the last fifty years—is recognized by our peers in the museum community as making an important and timely contribution to the discourse on contemporary photography.”

    The American Association of Museums has been bringing museums together since 1906, helping to develop standards and best practices, gathering and sharing knowledge, and providing advocacy on issues of concern for the entire museum community. The Nevada Museum of Art is the only accredited art museum in the state of Nevada, recognized for following best practices as outlined by the AAM and committed to continuous institutional improvement and change. Only 5% of all museums in the United States earn AAM accreditation, including institutions such as the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York and the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art.

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    The Nevada Museum of Art is a museum of ideas. The only accredited art museum in the state, it is a private, non-profit organization supported by the generosity of its membership as well as by sponsorships and grants. Through creative programming and scholarship, the Museum provides the opportunity for people to encounter, engage and enjoy a diversity of art experiences. The Museum is open Wednesday through Sunday, 10 am to 5 pm, late on Thursdays until 8 pm. The galleries, Museum Store and Café Musée are closed on Mondays, Tuesdays and national holidays. Admission is FREE for members, $10 General Admission, $8 Student / Senior, $1 children 6 to 12 years and free for children 5 and under. Museum Membership starts at just $30.

    » Images & Citations











  • NEVADA MUSEUM OF ART PRESENTS EDWARD BURTYNSKY: OIL JUNE 9 – SEPTEMBER 23, 2012



    » Press Release

    April 20, 2012 - Reno, Nev.–Edward Burtynsky: Oil, an original exhibition featuring more than 50 large-¬scale color landscapes by Canadian photographer Edward Burtynsky will be on view at the Nevada Museum of Art in Reno, Nevada, June 9 through September 23, 2012. The exhibition surveys a decade of photographic imagery exploring the subject of oil, chronicling the “life cycle” of this major energy resource, one that has profoundly shaped the modern world.

    “Edward Burtynsky’s timely and cautionary photographs have long been a vital part of the Nevada Museum of Art’s permanent Carol Franc Buck Altered Landscape photography collection,” commented Ann M. Wolfe, curator of exhibitions and collections, Nevada Museum of Art. “Given the Museum’s ongoing commitment to issues related to natural and built environments, we are thrilled that this international photographer’s work will be on view in our galleries.”

    Edward Burtynsky: Oil is an examination of one the most important subjects of our time by one of the most respected and recognized contemporary photographers in the world. From 1997 through 2009, Burtynsky traveled internationally to chronicle the production, distribution, and use of this critical fuel. In addition to revealing the rarely¬ seen mechanics of its manufacture, he photographs the effects of oil on our lives, depicting landscapes altered by its extraction from the Earth and by the sprawl generated around its use.

    Burtynsky's large-scale color photographs render his subjects with transfixing clarity of detail. His extensive exploration is organized thematically: aerial views of oil fields, the architecture of massive refineries, highway interchanges ribboning across the landscape, and motor culture aficionados at automotive events. The series concludes with arresting images of ancient oil derricks, vistas of junked vehicles, recycling yards, and mammoth ship breaking operations.

    SPONSORSHIP OF THE EXHIBITION
    Edward Burtynsky: Oil is organized by the Corcoran Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C., and made possible with the generous support of the Scotiabank Group. All photographs in the exhibition are chromogenic color prints and are lent by the artist, courtesy of Nicholas Metivier Gallery, Toronto, and Howard Greenberg & Bryce Wolkowitz, New York. The exhibition is on an international tour through 2013.

    Edward Burtynsky: Oil will be exhibited June 9 through September 23, 2012 at the Nevada Museum of Art, Donald W. Reynolds Center for the Visual Arts, E. L. Wiegand Gallery located at 160 West Liberty Street in downtown Reno. The Museum is open Wednesday through Sunday. Cost: Museum members free; $10 adults; $8 students/seniors; $1 children 6 – 12; free for children five and under. For more information, please call 775.329.3333 or visit www.nevadaart.org.

    ABOUT THE ARTIST
    Edward Burtynsky color photographs of industrially transformed landscapes are in the collections of major museums around the world, including the National Gallery of Canada, the Bibliothéque Nationale in Paris, and the Museum of Modern Art and Guggenheim Museum in New York. Born in 1955 of Ukrainian heritage in St. Catharines, Ontario, Burtynsky is a graduate of Ryerson University and Niagara College. His father worked on an automobile production line at a General Motors plant in his hometown; Burtynsky credits this experience as his earliest exposure to the subject of industry, and oil in particular. Major exhibitions include Manufactured Landscapes (2003); Before the Flood (2003); Burtynsky – China (2005); and Edward Burtynsky – Quarries (2006), all of which have traveled extensively to venues in Canada, the United States, Europe, and Asia. Among many other honors, in 2004 Burtynsky was awarded a prestigious TED Prize; he holds four honorary doctorate degrees, and in 2007 he was named an Officer of the Order of Canada, that nation’s highest civil honor.

    ABOUT THE BOOK
    A major book accompanies the exhibition and will be available in the Museum Store. Edward Burtynsky: Oil features essays by Paul Roth, Michael Mitchell, and William E. Rees, published by acclaimed German publisher Steidl as part of its Steidl/Corcoran imprint.

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    The Nevada Museum of Art is a museum of ideas. The only accredited art museum in the state, it is a private, non-profit organization supported by the generosity of its membership as well as by sponsorships and grants. Through creative programming and scholarship, the Museum provides the opportunity for people to encounter, engage and enjoy a diversity of art experiences. The Museum is open Wednesday through Sunday, 10 am to 5 pm, late on Thursdays until 8 pm. The galleries, Museum Store and Café Musée are closed on Mondays, Tuesdays and national holidays. Admission is FREE for members, $10 General Admission, $8 Student / Senior, $1 children 6 to 12 years and free for children 5 and under. Museum Membership starts at just $25.

    » Images & Citations

    Edward Burtynsky, Highway #1, Intersection 105 & 110, Los Angeles, California, USA, 2003. Chromogenic color print. Photograph © Edward Burtynsky, courtesy Nicholas Metivier Gallery, Toronto / Howard Greenberg & Bryce Wolkowitz, New York
    Edward Burtynsky, Highway #1, Intersection 105 & 110, Los Angeles, California, USA, 2003. Chromogenic color print. Photograph © Edward Burtynsky, courtesy Nicholas Metivier Gallery, Toronto / Howard Greenberg & Bryce Wolkowitz, New York

    Edward Burtynsky, AMARC #5, Davis-Monthan AFB, Tucson, Arizona, USA, 2006. Chromogenic color print. Photograph © Edward Burtynsky, courtesy Nicholas Metivier Gallery, Toronto / Howard Greenberg & Bryce Wolkowitz, New York
    Edward Burtynsky, AMARC #5, Davis-Monthan AFB, Tucson, Arizona, USA, 2006. Chromogenic color print. Photograph © Edward Burtynsky, courtesy Nicholas Metivier Gallery, Toronto / Howard Greenberg & Bryce Wolkowitz, New York


  • GREGORY EUCLIDE: NATURE OUT THERE OPENS MARCH 24 AT THE NEVADA MUSEUM OF ART



    » Press Release

    March 7, 2012 - Reno, Nev. (March 7, 2012) – Artist Gregory Euclide’s intricately crafted sculptural works, on view at the Nevada Museum of Art March 24 through September 2, 2012, explore the tension between idealized, picturesque views of landscapes and actual experiences of being in nature. Using traditional methods of landscape painting combined with natural materials and found objects, Euclide constructs three dimensional encapsulated worlds where pristine notions of landscape meet the reality of our current environment.

    Gregory Euclide is an artist and teacher living in the Minnesota River Valley. He received his MFA from the Minneapolis College of Art and Design. Euclide was awarded two Minnesota State Arts Board Artist Initiative Grants through the National Endowment for the Arts, and a Jerome Foundation Residency through the Blacklock Nature Sanctuary. This November, Euclide was a recipient of the 2011-12 Jerome Foundation Fellowships for Emerging Artists.

    Euclide’s work was featured in Badlands: New Horizons in Landscape at MASS MoCA (March 2008-April 2009) and was recently included in the exhibition Otherworldly at the Museum of Arts and Design in New York. His work is also featured on album covers of the 2012 Grammy award-winning musical group Bon Iver. Euclide’s work is currently on view in the exhibition Small Worlds at the Toledo Museum of Art in Ohio.

    Gregory Euclide: Nature Out There will be exhibited March 24 through September 2, 2012 at the Nevada Museum of Art, Donald W. Reynolds Center for the Visual Arts, E. L. Wiegand Gallery located at 160 West Liberty Street in downtown Reno. The Museum is open Wednesday through Sunday. Cost: Museum members free; $10 adults; $8 students/seniors; $1 children 6 – 12; free for children five and under. For more information, please call 775.329.3333 or visit www.nevadaart.org.

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    » Images & Citations

    Gregory Euclide, My Bare Foot Adds the Soft Bridge to Sky’s Repeating, 2011. Acrylic, canvas, euro cast, fruticose, moss, mylar, pencil, paper, sedum, sponge, and vellum, 29 x 23 x 7 inches. Courtesy of the artist and David B. Smith Gallery.
    Gregory Euclide, My Bare Foot Adds the Soft Bridge to Sky’s Repeating, 2011. Acrylic, canvas, euro cast, fruticose, moss, mylar, pencil, paper, sedum, sponge, and vellum, 29 x 23 x 7 inches. Courtesy of the artist and David B. Smith Gallery.

    Gregory Euclide, Surrounding My Hands in the Stain of Warmth Sinking, 2011. Acrylic, pencil, found foam, lichen, lily seed, moss, Mylar, photo transfer, pine, plastic, sage, sedum, sponge, wood, and wire, 29 x 23 x 8 inches. Courtesy of the artist and Dav
    Gregory Euclide, Surrounding My Hands in the Stain of Warmth Sinking, 2011. Acrylic, pencil, found foam, lichen, lily seed, moss, Mylar, photo transfer, pine, plastic, sage, sedum, sponge, wood, and wire, 29 x 23 x 8 inches. Courtesy of the artist and Dav


  • GUNS AND GLASS – CELEBRATE THE TIFFANY FAMILY DESIGN LEGACY AT NEVADA MUSEUM OF ART



    » Press Release

    January 13, 2012 - The Nevada Museum of Art is excited to announce three exhibitions that celebrate art of the Tiffany era. The Tiffany family design legacy is presented in this unique mix of exhibitions featuring Louis Comfort Tiffany’s stained glass of the Art Nouveau era and a rare collection of Tiffany & Co.’s decorative firearms. Charles Lewis Tiffany established Tiffany & Co. in 1837; while his son Louis Comfort Tiffany later founded Tiffany Studios, renowned for exquisite decorative objects.

    Out of the Forest: Art Nouveau Lamps
    This exhibition features 20 stained glass lamps manufactured in the early 20th century by the companies of Tiffany Studios; Handel; Durand; and Duffner & Kimberly. The exhibition focuses on themes related to the Art Nouveau style and its inspiration in nature, as well as the history of various design companies who competed for customers at the turn of the century. The lamps will be displayed on a 75-foot-long custom pedestal system designed in the shape of a dragonfly—Tiffany Studio’s company logo.
    All of the objects in this exhibition are from the private collection of Byron Vreeland.

    In the Company of Angels: Seven Rediscovered Tiffany Windows
    Comprised of seven stained glass window panels, the works in this exhibition were created by Tiffany Studios at the beginning of the 20th century and named for the angels in the Book of Revelation from the Bible. The windows were originally installed in the Church of the New Jerusalem in Cincinnati, Ohio until the building was taken by eminent domain and demolished for highway construction in 1964. The windows, crated and stored in various garages and sheds for decades, were re-discovered in 2001. This national exhibition tour debuts the story of these seven rediscovered Tiffany Windows.

    Arthur Femenella, a Tiffany stained glass expert, and conservator overseeing the restoration of these windows, explains: “These Tiffany windows are selected from a rich and varied palette of opalescent, drapery, rolled, textured, antiqued and flashed glass. The faces and flesh of the angels are delicately hand painted with vitreous paint. The rest of the windows are exquisitely plated, a technique developed by Tiffany and John La Farge involving the mechanical layering of layers of glass used to achieve great depth.”

    Tiffany & Co. Arms from the Robert M. Lee Collection
    This exclusive, single-venue exhibition highlights the wares of Tiffany & Co., the most distinguished name in decorative firearms in America — a surprise to those who might otherwise recognize the firm as a legendary purveyor of fine silver, jewelry and luxury objects. Founded in 1837 by Charles Lewis Tiffany, what became Tiffany & Co. commenced business just one year after the young inventor Samuel Colt registered his new designs for revolving pistols and long arms with the U.S. Patent Office. In the 175 years since then, the paths of Tiffany & Co. and Colt crossed many times.

    The Robert M. Lee Collection is recognized as the finest selection of Tiffany & Co. arms privately owned. The collection of arms in this exhibition — including three revolvers, four pistols, one rifle, and one presentation sword — is rivaled only by those on display in the Robert M. Lee Gallery of American Arms, at The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York.

    Major Sponsorship for Out of the Forest: Art Nouveau Lamps and In Company with Angels: Seven Rediscovered Tiffany Windows provided by I. Heidi Loeb Hegerich. Supporting sponsorship provided by Bally Technologies, Wells Fargo Foundation, Robert Z. Hawkins Foundation, and McDonald Carano Wilson LLP. Additional support provided by John and Andrea Deane. Exclusive sponsorship of Tiffany & Co. Arms from the Robert M. Lee Collection provided by Wayne L. Prim Foundation.

    Programming, including lectures, performing art, a film, and tours, are offered in conjunction with the exhibitions:
    MEMBERS’ PREMIERE Hosted by NV Energy
    Friday, February 10 / 6 – 8 pm
    Museum members are invited to be the first to view the celebrated Tiffany treasures from the turn of the century across three feature exhibitions. Live music and cash bar. Kids Open Art Studio available / $5. Cost: Admission is free for Museum Members with valid member card.

    PREMIERE TALK Dr. Martin Eidelberg on Clara Driscoll, the Tiffany Girls, and Art of the Tiffany Era
    Saturday, February 18 / 10:30 – 11:30 am
    Art Historian Dr. Martin Eidelberg is one of the foremost scholars of Tiffany art glass and lamp designs, and has conducted extensive and important scholarship on the role of women in Louis Comfort Tiffany’s studio. Please join the Museum for what promises to be a fascinating look into the life, art and history of Louis Comfort Tiffany and the art glass crafted in his studio.
    Cost: $15 / $10 Museum members

    ART BITE Meet the Artist: Corky Normart on Dalle de Verre Art Glass
    Friday, March 2 / noon
    Glass artist Corky Normart explains the Dalle de Verre art glass method and process.

    FILM My Fair Lady
    Saturday, March 10 / 10:30 am & 2 pm
    Enjoy the 1964 classic film, a landmark work of Art Nouveau-inspired production design.
    Admission is Free thanks to the Nightingale Family Foundation

    ART BITE R.L. Wilson on the Arms of Tiffany & Co.
    Friday, March 23 / noon
    Curator, writer and consultant on the history, art and design of firearms, R.L. Wilson discusses Tiffany & Co. arms and a fascinating introduction to the beautiful firearms on display.

    CHAMBER MUSIC SERIES
    Great Basin Brass Quintet and Woodwind Ensemble Lead by Eric Fassbender
    Saturday, February 25 / 3 pm
    Reno Early Music and Peter Epstein on Saxophone
    Saturday, March 31 / 3 pm
    In collaboration with the University of Nevada, Reno School of the Arts, the Museum presents a music performance series coinciding with the three Tiffany Era exhibitions on view. Enjoy a wide range of performances and musical styles responding to the art glass in display. Cost: 15 / $10 Museum Members

    Out of the Forest: Art Nouveau Lamps; In the Company of Angels: Seven Rediscovered Tiffany Windows; and Tiffany & Co. Arms from the Robert M. Lee Collection will be exhibited February 11 through May 20 at the Nevada Museum of Art, Donald W. Reynolds Center for the Visual Arts, E. L. Wiegand Gallery located at 160 West Liberty Street in downtown Reno. The Museum is open Wednesday through Sunday. Cost: Museum members free; $10 adults; $8 students/seniors; $1 children 6 – 12; free for children five and under. For more information, please call 775.329.3333 or visit www.nevadaart.org.

    ####
    The Nevada Museum of Art is a museum of ideas. The only accredited art museum in the state, it is a private, non-profit organization supported by the generosity of its membership as well as by sponsorships and grants. Through creative programming and scholarship, the Museum provides the opportunity for people to encounter, engage and enjoy a diversity of art experiences. The Museum is open Wednesday through Sunday, 10 am to 5 pm, late on Thursdays until 8 pm. The galleries, Museum Store and Café Musée are closed on Mondays, Tuesdays and national holidays. Admission is FREE for members, $10 General Admission, $8 Student / Senior, $1 children 6 to 12 years and free for children 5 and under. Museum Membership starts at just $25.


  • RARE TIFFANY & CO. ARMS ON DISPLAY AT THE NEVADA MUSEUM OF ART IN EXCLUSIVE, SINGLE-VENUE EXHIBITION



    » Press Release

    January 13, 2012 - In an exclusive, single-venue showing, the Nevada Museum of Art presents Tiffany & Co. Arms from the Robert M. Lee Collection featuring objects from the finest-known collection of privately owned Tiffany & Co. firearms rivaled only by those on view in the Robert M. Lee Gallery of American Arms at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York. On view February 11 - May 20, the exhibition features six Tiffany & Co.-designed revolvers, four pistols, one rifle, and one presentation sword from the Robert M. Lee Collection.

    The most distinguished name in decorative firearms in America is Tiffany & Co.—a surprise to those who might otherwise recognize the firm as a legendary purveyor of fine silver, jewelry and luxury objects. Founded in 1837 by Charles Lewis Tiffany, what became Tiffany & Co. commenced business just one year after the young inventor Samuel Colt registered his new designs for revolving pistols and long arms with the U.S. Patent Office. In the 175 years since then, the paths of Tiffany & Co. and Colt crossed many times. Among the other American gun makers with ties to Tiffany & Co. are Henry Deringer, Winchester, and Smith & Wesson.

    “The magic of Tiffany & Co. arms drew clients the likes of Theodore Roosevelt,” states R. L. Wilson, Curator of Firearms for the Robert M. Lee Collection, “and inspired the creative instincts of the firm's designers, from the first objects of the mid-19th century, continuing up through modern times. The Robert M. Lee Collection showcases some of Tiffany's most exquisite pieces."

    Tiffany’s production of presentation swords and fine guns began in the 1850s, reached a peak during the Civil War period (c. 1861-65), and continued through the close of World War I (c. 1918). The art of Tiffany & Co. arms was revived c. 1982, and remained active until c. 2001, with innovative modern era designs created by the firm’s Corporate Division. The Tiffany & Co. items in this exhibition span just over a century — they were made as early as 1893 and as recently as 1994.

    All of the rare arms in this exhibition are featured in a series of books being published by Yellowstone Press, under the umbrella title The Art of the Gun. The first book in the series, Magnificent Colts Selections from the Robert M. Lee Collection , will be released in January 2012 and available in the Nevada Museum of Art’s Museum Store.

    EXHIBITION HIGHLIGHTS:
    This special exhibition of selected Tiffany & Co. arms is the first major showing since The Artistry of Tiffany's Decorative Arms organized in 1991 by the firm's Archivist, Janet Zapata. That presentation was at the flagship Tiffany & Co. store on Fifth Avenue and 57th Street, New York, and coincided with premiering the Royal Armouries Smith & Wesson Tiffany Special, commissioned by the Armouries for display at Her Majesty's Tower of London. Among those present at the opening of the 1991 exhibition were the Lees, which led to adding the 'American Eagle Colt Army Pistol' to the Lee collection.

    **Among creators of the exquisite decorations on Tiffany & Co. arms was Paulding Farnham, considered by many to be the firm’s premier designer. The elaborate sword in this exhibition, featuring embellishments by Farnham, was presented to Admiral Robley D. Evans, Commander of the U.S.S. Iowa in the Battle of Santiago, a major victory in the Spanish-American War.
    **Certain pistol handle types made in the 19th century are identified by collectors as “Tiffany grips.” These were sometimes manufactured by Tiffany & Co., but most were produced by other firms, primarily in New York City—such as Schuyler, Hartley & Graham, military goods dealers and distributors. A Police Colt with Mexican Eagle Tiffany & Co. grips is featured in this exhibition.
    **Tiffany & Co. was renowned for its skills at etching, and a cased and inscribed pair of silver- and gold-finished, elaborately etched, Colt Model 1861 Navy revolvers—presented to frontier hero Wm. “Buffalo Bill” Mathewson—is included in this exhibition.

    The objects included in this exhibition are from the private collection of Robert M. Lee.
    Exclusive sponsorship of Tiffany & Co. Arms from the Robert M. Lee Collection provided by the Wayne L. Prim Foundation.

    PROGRAMMING AND EVENTS:
    MEMBERS’ PREMIERE Hosted by NV Energy
    Friday, February 10 / 6 – 8 pm
    Museum members are invited to be the first to view the celebrated Tiffany treasures from the turn of the century across three feature exhibitions. Live music and cash bar. Kids Open Art Studio available / $5. Cost: Admission is free for Museum Members with valid member card.

    ART BITE R.L. Wilson on the Arms of Tiffany & Co.
    Friday, March 23 / noon
    R.L. Wilson is a curator, writer and consultant on the history, art and design of firearms, who has studied Tiffany-designed firearms for nearly thirty years. Join the Museum in welcoming Wilson for a discussion of the arms designed by Tiffany & Co., and a fascinating introduction to the beautiful firearms on display.

    The Tiffany family design legacy is celebrated in a unique mix of exhibitions at the Nevada Museum of Art, February 11 through May 20, 2012, featuring Tiffany Studios’ stained glass of the art nouveau era and a rare collection of Tiffany & Co.’s decorative firearms. The exhibitions include: Tiffany & Co. Arms from the collection of Robert M. Lee; Out of the Forest: Art Nouveau Lamps; and In Company with Angels Seven Rediscovered Tiffany Windows.

    Tiffany & Co. Arms from the collection of Robert M. Lee will be exhibited February 11 through May 20, 2012 at the Nevada Museum of Art, Donald W. Reynolds Center for the Visual Arts, E. L. Wiegand Gallery located at 160 West Liberty Street in downtown Reno. The Museum is open Wednesday through Sunday. Cost: Museum members free; $10 adults; $8 students/seniors; $1 children 6 – 12; free for children five and under. For more information, please call 775.329.3333 or visit www.nevadaart.org.

    ####
    The Nevada Museum of Art is a museum of ideas. The only accredited art museum in the state, it is a private, non-profit organization supported by the generosity of its membership as well as by sponsorships and grants. Through creative programming and scholarship, the Museum provides the opportunity for people to encounter, engage and enjoy a diversity of art experiences. The Museum is open Wednesday through Sunday, 10 am to 5 pm, late on Thursdays until 8 pm. The galleries, Museum Store and Café Musée are closed on Mondays, Tuesdays and national holidays. Admission is FREE for members, $10 General Admission, $8 Student / Senior, $1 children 6 to 12 years and free for children 5 and under. Museum Membership starts at just $25.


  • SHAPING IDEAS AND STARTING CONVERSATIONS: THE 2011 ART + ENVIRONMENT CONFERENCE AT THE NEVADA MUSEUM OF ART



    » Press Release

    September 12, 2011 - “Museums can watch the world pass them by, or they can shape the trajectory of its course.” – David B. Walker, Executive Director | CEO, Nevada Museum of Art

    A flagship program of the Center for Art + Environment at the Nevada Museum of Art, the 2011 Art + Environment ConferenceSM brings together artists, scholars, designers, and writers for a dialogue that fosters new knowledge in the visual arts. Taking place September 29 through October 1, 2011, in Reno, Nevada, the A+E Conference reaches across continents, disciplines, and media to unite more than 30 dynamic thinkers that play a role in today’s ideas about human interactions with global environments.

    “When the Conference was first held in 2008, contemporary artists and designers across the globe were re-envisioning concepts of environments, exploring natural, built, and virtual environments,” states William L. Fox, Director of the Center for Art + Environment. “Today, three years later, the Center is a reality and with the expansion of our archives and the continuing dialogue we’ve fostered with our international advisory group, the Center is functioning as the nexus for the ongoing art and environment conversation.”

    Global interest in the intersections of nature and culture has broadened significantly since the first Art + Environment SM Conference in 2008, which brought together 18 presenters including artists Vito Acconci and Lita Albuquerque and scholar W.J.T. Mitchell. The 2011 Conference welcomes Diana Al Hadid, Subhankar Banerjee, David Benjamin, Richard Black, Edward Burtynsky, Gaetano Carboni, John Carty, Pilar Cereceda, William L. Fox, Amy Francheschini, Fritz Haeg, Helen Meyer Harrison and Newton Harrison, Laura Jackson, Patricia Johanson, Chris Jordan, Thomas Kellein, Geoff Manaugh, Mandy Martin, Christie Mazuera-Davis, Paul Miller, Gerald Nanson, Jorge Pardo, Rodrigo Pérez de Cereceda, John Reid, Alexander Rose, Sean Sheppard, Mark Smout, Bruce Sterling, Nicola Twilley, Leo Villareal, Stephen G. Wells, Ann M. Wolfe, and Liam Young.

    The Conference opens the evening of Thursday, September 29, with a Members Premiere of The Altered Landscape: Photographs of a Changing Environment , the Museum’s signature photography collection and backdrop exhibition to the Conference. A Welcome Reception follows, featuring an informal gallery dialogue with Museum Curator Ann M. Wolfe, Center Director William L. Fox, and assorted guest curators and artists. At 9pm Paul D. Miller aka DJ Spooky takes the stage performing live with musicians from the Reno Philharmonic, led by Dustin Budish. Recreating sonic soundscapes of the Earth's polar regions, Miller’s performance uses live symphonic performance and electronic music to conceptually interpret the environments of the Arctic and Antarctic, human interactions with them, and environmental changes affecting these fragile places.

    The Conference program features solo artist presentations allowing for in-depth conversations regarding each artist’s body of work.
    Alexander Rose: Designing for Longevity
    Futurist Bruce Sterling will introduce Alexander Rose, Director of The Long Now Foundation, who will discuss the design and construction of a monument-sized, 10,000-year clock as an icon to long-term thinking.

    Edward Burtynsky: In the Wake of Progress Canadian photographer Edward Burtynsky examines nature as it is transformed through industry, such as recycling yards, mine tailings, quarries and refineries - all places outside the everyday experience of the average person, yet Burtynsky notes that we all partake of their industrial production on a daily basis.

    Fahrenheit Rising: Adapting Ecologies in the Sierra Nevada: Helen Mayer Harrison and Newton Harrison Internationally-renowned environmental artists Helen Mayer Harrison and Newton Harrison propose a series of long-term ecological responses that have the potential to mitigate the negative effects of global warming on the Sierra’s vulnerable ecosystems.

    Designing the Wild and Cultivating the City: Fritz Haeg Described by the New York Times as an “architect by training and a landscaper by nature,” Fritz Haeg’s ecological initiatives fuse fields of design, architecture, and eco-activism.

    Thomas Kellein: Chinati at a Crossroads: Art and Environment in West Texas
    A contemporary art museum based upon the ideas of its founder Donald Judd, The Chinati Foundation preserves and presents permanent large-scale installations by Judd, John Chamberlain, Dan Flavin, Richard Long, Claes Oldenburg and Coosje van Bruggen.

    Patricia Johanson: Ecologies of Infrastructure
    Art, ecology, landscaping and functional infrastructure meet in all of Patricia Johanson’s creative endeavors including municipal flood basins, sewers, water-treatment systems, and flood control structures.
    Meditations on Mediation: Leo Villareal on Technologies of Perception
    The most prominent light sculptor of his generation, Leo Villareal creates immersive interactive sculptures that respond to unique architectural features of the built environment, while simultaneously activating these spaces in hypnotic and exhilarating ways.

    Visual Eclectics: Jorge Pardo’s Art(chitectures)
    Recognized as a 2010 Fellow by the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, Jorge Pardo continually challenges the definition of traditional fine art by blurring the boundaries between design, architecture, and everyday objects.

    The Conference also includes panel discussions moderated by experts in the field:
    Framing Consumption: Photographies of Sustainability
    Photographers Subhankar Banerjee and Chris Jordan join Edward Burtynsky in a conversation about global consumption and sustainability.

    Designing Architectures for Environmental Change
    This session, moderated by futurist Bruce Sterling, explores shifting terrains of architectural invention, where the construction of new spatial devices on a variety of scales—from the inhabitable to the portable—uncover previously inaccessible aspects of the built and natural environments.

    Not Horsing Around: Amy Franceschini and Farming in the Future
    Amy Franceschini’s most recent project, This is Not a Trojan Horse, concerns rural regeneration in the Abruzzo region of Italy, where globalization has had a significant impact on traditional modes of farming and agriculture.

    Navigating the Waters of Art and Science in Australia
    This session brings together a range of creative voices working around rivers and their environments in Australia.

    Composing Place: Music of Sean Shepherd
    A graduate of The Juilliard School and a winner of multiple awards for his musical compositions, Sean Shepherd—2011 Composer-in-Residence with the Reno Philharmonic—presents a new musical work written in response to the Nevada landscape.

    Critical Velocity: Bruce Sterling Speculations
    Author and visionary Bruce Sterling closes the Conference with reflections on the issues raised and suggestions for potential directions for future dialogue.

    As a backdrop to the 2011 Art + Environment Conference, the Museum’s galleries will be programmed with 14 exhibitions serving as a springboard for Conference sessions and keynote presentations:

    Major sponsorship by the Louise A. Tarble Foundation. Supporting sponsorship by the Carol Franc Buck Foundation, the Wilhelm Hoppe Family Trust and the Elke Hoppe Youth Advancement Trust, The Phil and Jennifer Satre Family Charitable Fund at the Community Foundation of Western Nevada and Chevron Energy Solutions. Contributing sponsors include the Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, the Lannan Foundation, the Odyssey Foundation and Lance and Karyn Tendler. Additional support by NV Energy, the Stremmel Gallery, Earl & Meg Tarble, Carole and Robert Anderson, Barrik Gold of North America, Bob and Del Noland, and DRI. Media support by KNPB Channel 5 Public Broadcasting.
    For more information and tickets visit: www.nevadaart.org/conference2011

    # # #

    The Center for Art + Environment (CA+E) is an internationally recognized research center, located at the Nevada Museum of Art, that supports the practice, study and awareness of creative interactions between people and their natural, built, and virtual environments. The only accredited art museum in the state, the Nevada Museum of Art is a private, non-profit organization.


  • LANDSCAPE FUTURES: INSTRUMENTS, DEVICES AND ARCHITECTURAL INVENTIONS



    » Press Release

    August 19, 2011 - On view now at the Nevada Museum of Art in Reno, NV, Landscape Futures: Instruments, Devices and Architectural Inventions is an ambitious exhibition that travels the shifting terrains of architectural invention, where new spatial devices on a variety of scales—from the inhabitable to the portable—reveal previously inaccessible dimensions of the built and natural environments. Guest curated by Geoff Manaugh—the imaginative futurist behind BLDGBLOG , and a writer praised by novelist Bruce Sterling as “the world’s greatest living practitioner of ‘architecture fiction’”—the exhibition is on view through February 12, 2012.

    One of 14 exhibitions featured during the Museum’s 2011 Art + Environment Conference, a cornerstone program of its Center for Art + Environment (CA+E), Landscape Futures introduces visitors to the visceral powers of architectural technology, spatial invention, and perceptual design. The interdisciplinary work—snapshots of ongoing research projects—by a diverse group of individuals aims to redefine boundaries between art, architecture, science, and design.

    The exhibition boasts an extraordinary mix of new commissions and preexisting work—including a room-sized kinetic mechanism, speculative prototypes, large-scale prints, and portable devices—by Mark Smout & Laura Allen (Smout Allen), David Benjamin & Soo-in Yang (The Living), David Gissen, Mason White & Lola Sheppard (Lateral Office & InfraNet Lab), Chris Woebken & Kenichi Okada, and Liam Young. From philosophical toys to ironic provocations, the devices are not merely diagnostic but creative, deploying fiction as a means of exploring alternative futures. The speculative machines reveal the multitude of ways through which landscapes can be read, interpreted, augmented, and understood, while also proposing a larger question: what has yet to be measured—and what do those measurements tell us about ourselves?

    As guest curator Geoff Manaugh explained in a recent interview with Wired Science , “the overall idea is to look at how the landscapes around us—natural and artificial, urban and geologic, aquatic, terrestrial, and atmospheric—are interpreted, filtered, or otherwise augmented by instruments, devices, and machines.” In the process, he adds, the exhibition asks how these systems can transform the ways human beings understand and inhabit the planet: “The exhibition puts all this into the context of landscape architecture and architecture more broadly—all the way up to the scale of infrastructure. We’re looking at what artists and architects can design that would further transform how we understand and interact with the landscapes around us.”

    But Landscape Futures is not a trade-show of industrial tools; nor is it a paean to the potential of handheld electronics, locative media, and iPhone apps. The exhibition instead features original objects, models, prototypes, graphics, and speculative proposals, ranging from the physical to the digital, from the geological to the conceptual, from the fictitious to the real, and from deep-time to the hand-made. Each, in its own way, connects across species boundaries, academic disciplines, spatial scales, and planetary eras to harness the transformative potential of architectural design—moving beyond straightforward responsive mechanisms to redefine the relationship between humans and their environment.

    Together, the works form a stimulating, multimedia response to critical questions: What would an architecture that allows us to reinterpret and experience landscape in previously unimagined ways look like—and how would it function? What instruments might we require to prospect for previously unknown resources, reconfiguring the global geography of value embedded in our perceptions of nature? And how will historical preservation and landscape management change given access to new spatial mechanisms and radical technologies?

    “ Landscape Futures is an important exhibition for the Nevada Museum of Art,” commented William L. Fox, Director of the Center for Art + Environment, “because it helps to achieve three primary goals of the Center: encouraging the creation of works expressing the interaction between people and their natural, built, and virtual environments; convening artists, scholars, and communities to document, research, and analyze those works; and to increase public knowledge of these important creative and scholarly endeavors,”

    The Nevada Museum of Art and Geoff Manaugh have enjoyed a rich and intertwined relationship that dates back several years. When the Museum founded the Center for Art + Environment in 2009, Manaugh was invited to join the Center’s Advisory Board. Since then, he has had an important hand in helping to shape this internationally recognized research center that supports the practice, study and awareness of creative interactions between people and their natural, built, and virtual environments.

    GEOFF MANAUGH, Guest Curator (Los Angeles & New York)
    This exhibition is guest curated by Geoff Manaugh, a writer and essayist whose work at the award-winning BLDGBLOG surveys “architectural conjecture, urban speculation and landscape futures.” He is former senior editor of Dwell magazine and a contributing editor at Wired UK , and he continues to write for such publications at the New York Times, GOOD, Dwell, Domus , and Volume Magazine . In August 2011, he became co-director, with Nicola Twilley, of Studio-X New York, an architectural gallery and urban think tank run by Columbia University. Previously, Manaugh co-curated Landscapes of Quarantine , a group show at New York’s legendary Storefront for Art and Architecture, and he has taught design studios and research seminars at Columbia University, the Pratt Institute, the University of Technology, Sydney, and the University of Southern California.

    SMOUT ALLEN (London) | Surface Tension
    A vertically organized network of more than 2,000 individual parts is suspended from the ceiling. Cranked mechanisms, computational devices, gold space blankets, and counterbalanced kinetic switches pulse through undulations and waves that mimic the droughts, rains, surges, and floods of the planet’s hydrological cycle. Subject to its own internal tides, Surface Tension might best be understood as a technological landscape: both animated and annotated with complex recording devices.

    In their related proposals for “neo-natures” in Lanzarote, the River Severn, and an unnamed fictional metropolis of the future, architects Mark Smout and Laura Allen have produced mechanical prototypes that make visible the processes through which water is managed and distributed worldwide. Smout Allen’s work makes a coherent if magical machine out of the everyday technologies of water management — showing that the technical systems through which we manage water are often as mythic as the water itself.

    LIAM YOUNG (London) | Specimens of Unnatural History
    Architect-provocateur Liam Young presents a cautionary tale of ecological preservation gone awry. In these new additions to his Specimens of Unnatural History series we witness conservation’s last gasp. Here, autonomous packs of biotechnological robot drones have been deployed to protect the most idealized landscape — Darwin’s Galapagos — from invasive species.

    Half animal, half machine, Young’s devices suggest that even the most distant Eden will someday be no more than what he calls a “robot zoo.” Populated by the invented and the assembled (not the evolved) Young’s wilderness is regulated, controlled, and uncannily augmented. Are managed landscapes still natural, these creatures ask? And, if not, are they still worth preserving?

    DAVID GISSEN (San Francisco) | Museums of the City
    If the internal space of a museum can be seen as a device for transforming everyday objects into historical artifacts, what happens when the techniques of the museum escape into the city at large? When pedestals, lighting, and high-end air-conditioning systems take up residence in the streets, alongside urban rivers, and in the trees and plazas of a functioning metropolis?

    Historian David Gissen offers four provocative images of the city transformed into a museum of itself, with often-overlooked scenes of its own past reframed in spatially complex ways. In the process, Gissen’s images foreground the interpretive structures through which objects enter “official” history, giving them a monumental and highly public form.

    LATERAL OFFICE & INFRANET LAB (Toronto) | The Active Layer & Next North
    In the field of geomorphology, the “active layer” is the topmost crust of Arctic permafrost: a globally unique ecosystem that partially melts and refreezes each season. What new forms of architecture — indeed, what new forms of life — could both mirror and respond to this dynamic landscape, one whose delicate rhythms have been thrown off-kilter by rapid climate change?

    Perched atop this unpredictably shifting Arctic terrain are detailed miniature buildings. With these, Mason White and Lola Sheppard argue that new terrestrial conditions demand a new architecture, one as opportunistic as it is adaptive. Caribou migration stations, ice road truck stops, airport-hospitals, and other previously uncalled-for typologies are but a few examples of what we might build in what they refer to as the next north.

    CHRIS WOEBKEN & KENICHI OKADA (New York & Tokyo) | Animal Superpowers
    What does the world look like to animals — to a giraffe, for instance, its head towering over forests and buildings? How do birds sense the airspace through which they soar? Can an ant comprehend the true scale of the planet?

    Interaction designers Chris Woebken and Kenichi Okada attempt to answer these questions — whimsically and with tongue firmly in cheek — through their project Animal Superpowers . Wearable toys immerse their users in the extraordinary sensory worlds of other species. These playful devices allow human beings to inhabit the landscape from a radically new perspective, reframing their relationship with the planet and with the other animals that call it home.

    THE LIVING (New York) | The Gray Rush
    In the speculative future proposed by architects David Benjamin and Soo-in Yang, lone prospectors dreaming of mineral riches haunt the annihilating emptiness of the salt flats, testing for lithium deposits beneath a seemingly infinite landscape. The hypothetical devices on display use techniques of chromatography to pan for “gray gold”—or lithium, used in ultra-light battery manufacture—by breaking through the salt crust to test the brine beneath.

    The Gray Rush deploys an antiquated technology of paper sensors, combined with a futuristic scenario of lithium scarcity, to examine how economically unproductive landscapes can be fundamentally revalued. At the same time, old tools have been inventively reused in a search for new sources of terrestrial wealth.

    Landscape Futures: Instruments, Devices and Architectural Inventions is guest curated by Geoff Manaugh. It is mounted in the Museum’s 2,500 square foot Contemporary Gallery as a part of the Museum’s 2011 Art + Environment Season on view during the second Art + Environment Conference, September 29–October 1, 2011.

    Sponsorship for this exhibition is provided by the Graham Foundation for Advanced Studies in the Fine Arts, the Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts and the National Endowment for the Arts.

    ####
    The Nevada Museum of Art is a private, non-profit organization supported by the generosity of its membership as well as by sponsorships and grants. Through creative programming and scholarship, the Museum provides the opportunity for people to encounter, engage and enjoy a diversity of art experiences. The Museum is open Wednesday through Sunday, 10 am to 5 pm, late on Thursdays until 8 pm. The galleries, Museum Store and Café Musée are closed on Mondays, Tuesdays and national holidays.


  • THE ALTERED LANDSCAPE: PHOTOGRAPHS OF A CHANGING ENVIRONMENT OPENS



    » Press Release

    August 8, 2011 - Reno, Nev. (FOR RELEASE July 15, 2011) – Situated at the geographic nexus of awe-inspiring scenery and rapidly-changing surroundings, the Nevada Museum of Art is an ideal place for conversations about the ways that humans creatively interact with natural, built, and virtual environments. Showcasing photographs that examine human interaction and intervention with environments The Altered Landscape: Photographs of a Changing Environment is the Museum’s signature photography collection premiering September 24, 2011 through January 8, 2012. A significant exhibition with an accompanying publication, The Altered Landscape represents a milestone for the Museum on the occasion of its 80th Anniversary in 2011.

    “The revisionist portion of this collection,” according to cultural critic Dave Hickey, “is informed by the suspicion that the way we represent the landscape is somehow complicit in our exploitation of it. So these photographers aspire to portray nature differently and, in doing so, portray another nature altogether—a “one way” nature that is as chaotic, dynamic, and historical as culture itself.”

    The Altered Landscape Photography Collection was founded in the early 1990s. Thanks to a generous endowment, and the continuing support of Carol Franc Buck and the Carol Franc Buck Foundation, the Museum has built an impressive collection of photographs worthy of international attention. Some of the leading photographers in this collection include Bernd and Hilla Becher, Robert Adams, Lewis Baltz, Edward Burtynsky, Amy Stein, Terry Evans, David Maisel, Olivo Barbieri and Fandra Chang. The momentum of the Collection's growth and depth became the scholarly groundwork for the 2009 launch of the Museum's Center for Art + Environment (CA+E), an internationally-recognized research center that supports the practice, study and awareness of creative interactions between people and their natural, built and virtual environments.

    “These photographers reveal the ways that individuals and industries have marked, mined, toured, tested, developed, occupied, and exploited landscapes over the last fifty years,” commented Ann M. Wolfe, Curator of Exhibitions and Collections, Nevada Museum of Art. “Viewing these photographs as a collection reveals that much of today’s human activity involves the physical alteration of land and the making of marks on the Earth and that the Earth’s surface offers an irrefutable record of human civilization’s impressive endeavors—as well its worst failures.”

    The exhibition will be accompanied by a comprehensive, 288-page deluxe publication published by Skira Rizzoli that examines the collection’s roots in the 1970s New Topographics movement and highlights recent photographic acquisitions in this rapidly changing field. The book features essays by Ann M. Wolfe; Geoff Manaugh, author of BLDBLOG and Contributing Editor of Wired UK, also an advisor for the Center for Art + Environment (CA+E) and featured presenter at 2011 Art + Environment Conference; Lucy Lippard, cultural critic and an advisor for the CA+E; WJT Mitchell, Professor of English and Art History, University of Chicago, also an editor, a scholar and theorist of media, visual art, and literature.

    The Altered Landscape is the featured exhibition in the 2011 Art + Environment Season – the backdrop of the 2011 Art + Environment Conference taking place at the Museum September 29 through October 1, 2011. During the A+E Season, the Museum’s galleries will be programmed with exhibitions related to natural, built, and virtual environments—serving as a springboard for Conference sessions and keynote presentations. Among the exhibitions on view will be: The Altered Landscape: Photographs of a Changing Environment; Helen Mayer Harrison & Newton Harrison: Sierra Nevada|An Adaptation; Landscape Futures: Instruments, Devices and Architectural Inventions; Photographs by Jean-Luc Mylayne: The Heavens are Blue; Fog Garden: The Architecture of Water; This is Not a Trojan Horse: A Project by Amy Franceschini and Mike Taussig; Water Thief: Diana Al-Hadid; Shirin Neshat: Passage; The Unworthiness of Our Response: Photographs by Robert Adams; Richard Black: Australia’s Murray River; Tim Hawkinson: Totem; Linda Fleming: Modeling the Universe; Jacob Hashimoto: Here in Sleep, a World, Muted to a Whisper; and Art, Science, and the Arc of Inquiry: The Evolution of the Nevada Museum of Art.

    SPONSORSHIP:
    The Nevada Museum of Art gratefully acknowledges the following supporters for their enthusiastic support of The Altered Landscape: Photographs of a Changing Landscape. Major Sponsor: Carol Franc Buck Foundation; Sponsors: National Endowment for the Arts, Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Generous Supporters: Wilhelm and Elke Hoppe Living Trust; The Robert Mapplethorpe Foundation, Atlantis Casino Resort and Spa, Daniel Greenberg and Susan Steinhauser, Stremmel Gallery, Maureen Mullarkey, Kathie Bartlett; Additional Support: Cultural Services of the French Embassy, New York. Grants for equipment and technology from the following organizations also made this project possible: The Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS), Western States Arts Federation (WESTAF) with the Nevada Arts Council and the National Endowment for the Arts.

    The Altered Landscape: Photographs of a Changing Environment will be exhibited September 24, 2011 through January 8, 2012 at the Nevada Museum of Art, Donald W. Reynolds Center for the Visual Arts, E. L. Wiegand Gallery located at 160 West Liberty Street in downtown Reno. The Museum is open Wednesday through Sunday. Cost: Museum members free; $10 adults; $8 students/seniors; $1 children 6 – 12; free for children five and under. For more information, please call 775.329.3333 or visit www.nevadaart.org.

    ####
    The Nevada Museum of Art is a museum of ideas. The only accredited art museum in the state, it is a private, non-profit organization supported by the generosity of its membership as well as by sponsorships and grants. Through creative programming and scholarship, the Museum provides the opportunity for people to encounter, engage and enjoy a diversity of art experiences. The Museum is open Wednesday through Sunday, 10 am to 5 pm, late on Thursdays until 8 pm. The galleries, Museum Store and Café Musée are closed on Mondays, Tuesdays and national holidays. Admission is FREE for members, $10 General Admission, $8 Student / Senior, $1 children 6 to 12 years and free for children 5 and under. Museum Membership starts at just $25.

    » Events & Programs

    • Meet the Critic: A Dialogue with Rebecca Solnit on The Altered Landscape

      Thursday October 20, 2011 / 1:00 pm – 2:00 pm

      San Francisco-based writer Rebecca Solnit is among the brightest minds illuminating the relationship of people to the places they inhabit. Join Solnit as she participates in a dialogue with Colin M. Robertson, the Charles N. Mathewson Curator of Education, examining the ideas central to the exhibition of The Altered Landscape. Solnit is the author of thirteen books and innumerable essays exploring ideas about art and photography, landscape, public life, memory, politics and ecology. She is also contributing editor to Harper’s, and the recipient of a Guggenheim Fellowship, the National Book Critics Circle Award, and the Lannan Literary Award.

      This program is generously sponsored by the University of Nevada, Reno Donald W. Reynolds School of Journalism in collaboration with Nevada Humanities, and funded with generous support by the UNR College of Liberal Arts Hilliard Endowment and the John Ben Snow Memorial Trust. Cosponsored by the Nevada Museum of Art’s Center for Art + Environment, in collaboration with UNR's Literature and Environment Program.

    • The Altered Landscape Members Premiere Hosted by NV Energy

      Thursday September 29, 2011 / 6:00 pm – 8:00 pm

      Museum members are treated to an exclusive night of live music and cash bar in the atrium as we showcase our signature photography collection. $4 Kids Open Art Studio available. Admission is free for Museum members with valid member card.



  • “LIVE FOREVER” THIS SUMMER AT THE NEVADA MUSEUM OF ART



    » Press Release

    May 27, 2011 - Explore ancient Egyptian beliefs about life, death, and the afterlife in To Live Forever: Egyptian Treasures from the Brooklyn Museum , while celebrating the birthday of the Nevada Museum of Art – commemorating the 80th anniversary in 2011. Drawn from the legendary antiquities collection of the Brooklyn Museum, the exhibition explores the funerary beliefs and customs practiced for nearly four-thousand years by ancient Egyptians from various social classes. Answering questions at the core of the public’s fascination with ancient Egypt, the exhibition delves into the process of mummification, the conduct of a funeral, and various types of tombs through more than 100 objects including mummies, sarcophagi, coffins, gold jewelry, and elegantly-crafted vessels.

    “ To Live Forever is the perfect exhibition to mark the Museum’s 80th anniversary,” stated Ann M. Wolfe, Curator of Exhibitions and Collections, Nevada Museum of Art. “Bringing such a prestigious collection of artifacts to the state is the ideal way of celebrating the Museum’s successes and accomplishments, including its status as the oldest cultural institution in Nevada. The pieces in this exhibition will highlight not just the lives of the elite and wealthy, but allows audiences to explore the lives of everyday ancient Egyptians, and how they shared similar belief systems as they prepared for the afterlife and accepted death.”

    Specially-designed interpretation – highlighted by dramatic lighting and fabrics that create an immersive futuristic environment – acknowledges the recent political revolution in Egypt and includes speculative commentary from best-selling science fiction author and futurist Bruce Sterling, accompanied by an 80-foot panoramic mural depicting a possible future Egypt. In much the same way that the ancient objects on display offer only traces of historical evidence helping us to understand Egypt’s dynamic past, Sterling’s contribution and the accompanying mural sketches one of many possibilities for the future of this dynamic and rapidly-changing culture and country.

    A wide array of themed events are scheduled this summer to celebrate the Museum’s 80th anniversary during the exhibition including a special talk with the renowned Dr. Zahi Hawass, a night of indulgence as the Museum is transformed into the ancient Egyptian underworld, and a free day of events, activities and performances for all ages.

    SPECIAL EVENTS:
    MATINEE TALK: Dr. Zahi Hawass, Egyptian Minister of Antiquities
    Friday, June 17 / noon / Peppermill Resort Spa Casino
    World-renowned archaeologist Dr. Zahi Hawass, Minister of Antiquities, Egypt leads audiences through a riveting voyage of discovery including excavations at the Valley of the Kings, uncovering the mysteries of Tutankhamun and Ramesses III, identifying ancient royal mummies using modern technology, revealing the secret tales of the Step Pyramid, the world’s oldest pyramid and the Great Pyramid of Khufu. Dr. Hawass will also share details of how the mummy of the female king, Hatshepsut, was rediscovered and the story of his five year search to uncover the tombs of Cleopatra and Mark Antony. A special performance by the UCSB Middle Eastern Ensemble opens the program.
    $15 / $12 MUSEUM MEMBERS
    Sponsored by Peppermill Resort Spa Casino with additional support from the Nightingale Family Foundation.

    Pyramid Party
    Friday, June 17 / 7 – 10:30 pm
    Guarded and greeted by Egyptian gods of the underworld, Anubis and Apis, guests will travel back through time to the romanticized era of archeology and exploration. Partake in a bountiful feast offered on sumptuous banquet tables then ascend the staircase toward sacred art galleries meant to be seen only by pharaonic royalty. Throughout the evening, encounter aerialists, acrobats, hand to hand balancing acts and a spectacular performance by a Whirling Dervish. The event’s exotic ambiance is accentuated by a special presentation by the UCSB Middle Eastern Ensemble. Egyptian, adventure and 1930’s inspired costumes encouraged.
    $300 / $275 MUSEUM MEMBERS | Prepaid tickets are required
    Presented by the 80 for 80 Anniversary Host Committee. UCSB Middle Eastern Ensemble presented by Nancy Siebens-Binz. Additional support by Freeman.

    Egyptian Birthday Bazaar
    Saturday, June 18 / 3 – 11 pm
    Celebrate the Museum’s 80th Anniversary with members, family and friends at this party inspired by Cairo’s bustling street bazaar. During the afternoon, the Museum will be transformed into a lively marketplace complete with live music and acrobats, food and giftware vendors, stilt walkers, fortune tellers and sword-swallowers. Create your own adventure while participating in a treasure hunt and exploration of To Live Forever: Egyptian Treasures from the Brooklyn Museum . As evening falls, stay late for a dance party in the atrium to the electro-orchestral sounds of EO. Ride your bike for free valet courtesy of the Reno Bike Project.
    ADMISSION TO THE PARTY AND THE MUSEUM IS FREE
    Major sponsorship by IGT. Host sponsorship by NV Energy. Additional support by Eldorado Hotel Casino.

    A Night at the Museum
    Saturday, July 16 at 5 pm through Sunday, July 17 at 8 am
    Sleep with the Mummies! This co-ed summer sleepover for kids ages 7-12 features an entire night of kid-friendly activities, a flashlight tour, snacks, and a film. Explore the unknown world of ancient Egypt. Stare down the mask of a real Egyptian mummy. End your night by falling asleep in the darkened halls of the Museum. Catch Mummy Madness at the Nevada Museum of Art!
    $65 PER CHILD / $55 MUSEUM MEMBERS
    $15 PER CHAPERONE/GROUP LEADER A Chaperone/Group Leader is required. Groups can range in size from 1-4 participants. Chaperones must be at least 21 years old.
    For more information and to register contact Claire Munoz at 775-329-3333 x253, or email claire.munoz@nevadaart.org.

    OTHER EVENTS:
    ART BITE Hugh Roy Marshall on the Egyptian Book of the Dead
    Friday, July 8 / noon
    The Egyptian Book of the Dead is an important funerary text that Egyptians’ buried with their dead to prepare them for the afterlife. Join longtime student of Middle Eastern culture Hugh Roy Marshall for an enlightening look at these important texts. Cost: $5 / $4 Museum members

    TALK Dr. Edward Bleiberg on To Live Forever: Egyptian Treasures from the Brooklyn Museum
    Thursday, July 14 / 6 pm
    Dr. Edward Bleiberg, Curator of Egyptian, Classical and Ancient Middle Eastern Art at the Brooklyn Museum, speaks about the origins and meanings of rare and precious ancient Egyptian artifacts on display in To Live Forever: Egyptian Treasures from the Brooklyn Museum. Cost: $15 / $12 Museum members

    ART BITE Cultural Anthropologist Jill Derby on the Revolutionary Events in the Middle East
    Friday, July 22 / noon
    Revolutionary cultural and political events of recent months in Egypt and elsewhere in the Middle East, and the long and complex history of the region, are discussed by cultural anthropologist Jill Derby, former Regent for the Nevada System of Higher Education. Cost: $5 / $4 Museum members

    SPONSORSHIP:
    To Live Forever: Egyptian Treasures from the Brooklyn Museum has been organized by the Brooklyn Museum. Lead sponsorship for this exhibition is provided by the E. L. Wiegand Foundation, Goldcorp USA, I. Heidi Loeb Hegerich, the Wayne L. Prim Foundation and Wells Fargo. Major sponsorship is provided by The Thelma B. and Thomas P. Hart Foundation, IGT, Hugh Roy Marshall, Maureen Mullarkey, NV Energy and Mark E Pollack Foundation. Supporting sponsorship by Eldorado Hotel Casino, Anne Brockinton Lee and Robert M. Lee, Peppermill Resort Spa Casino, Nancy Siebens-Binz and the Whittier Trust Company. Funding provided by the Nevada Arts Council, a state agency, and the National Endowment for the Arts, a federal agency.

    To Live Forever: Egyptian Treasures from the Brooklyn Museum will be exhibited June 11 through September 4, 2011 at the Nevada Museum of Art, Donald W. Reynolds Center for the Visual Arts, E. L. Wiegand Gallery located at 160 West Liberty Street in downtown Reno. The Museum is open Wednesday through Sunday. Admission: Museum members free; $10 adults; $8 students/seniors; $1 children 6 – 12; free for children five and under. For more information, please call 775.329.3333 or visit www.nevadaart.org.

    ####
    The Nevada Museum of Art is a museum of ideas. The only accredited art museum in the state, it is a private, non-profit organization supported by the generosity of its membership as well as by sponsorships and grants. Through creative programming and scholarship, the Museum provides the opportunity for people to encounter, engage and enjoy a diversity of art experiences. The Museum is open Wednesday through Sunday, 10 am to 5 pm, late on Thursdays until 8 pm. The galleries, Museum Store and Café Musée are closed on Mondays, Tuesdays and national holidays. Admission is FREE for members, $10 General Admission, $8 Student / Senior, $1 children 6 to 12 years and free for children 5 and under. Museum Membership starts at just $30.

    » Images & Citations

    Mummy Mask of a Man, Roman Period, early 1st century C.E. Stucco. Gilded and painted, 20 1/4 x 13 x 7 7/8 in. (51.5 x 33 x 20 cm). Place made: Egypt, Africa. Collection of the Brooklyn Museum, Charles Edwin Wilbour Fund.
    Mummy Mask of a Man, Roman Period, early 1st century C.E. Stucco. Gilded and painted, 20 1/4 x 13 x 7 7/8 in. (51.5 x 33 x 20 cm). Place made: Egypt, Africa. Collection of the Brooklyn Museum, Charles Edwin Wilbour Fund.

    Shabty of Amunemhat, New Kingdom, reign of Tuthmosis IV - reign of Akhenaten, ca. 1400-1336 B.C.Limestone, painted. 10 5/8 x 3 1/8 x 2 inches. Possible place collected: Tomb 82, Thebes, Egypt, Africa. Charles Edwin Wilbour Fund.
    Shabty of Amunemhat, New Kingdom, reign of Tuthmosis IV - reign of Akhenaten, ca. 1400-1336 B.C.Limestone, painted. 10 5/8 x 3 1/8 x 2 inches. Possible place collected: Tomb 82, Thebes, Egypt, Africa. Charles Edwin Wilbour Fund.

    Anthropoid Coffin of the Servant of the Great Place, Teti New Kingdom, ca. 1339-1307 B.C.E. Wood, painted Box with lid in place: 33 7/16 x 26 3/16 x 83 1/2 inches, 248 lb. Place made: Thebes, Egypt, Africa. Collection of the Brooklyn Museum, Charles Edwin
    Anthropoid Coffin of the Servant of the Great Place, Teti New Kingdom, ca. 1339-1307 B.C.E. Wood, painted Box with lid in place: 33 7/16 x 26 3/16 x 83 1/2 inches, 248 lb. Place made: Thebes, Egypt, Africa. Collection of the Brooklyn Museum, Charles Edwin


  • THE NEVADA MUSEUM OF ART CELEBRATES 80 YEARS OF MAKING THE COMMUNITY LOOK



    » Press Release

    March 18, 2011 - The Nevada Museum of Art celebrates its 80th Anniversary in 2011 with an ambitious series of special exhibitions and events carefully chosen to reflect the Museum’s mission and to connect with the community and visitors it serves. The blockbuster exhibition of the year, To Live Forever: Egyptian Treasures from the Brooklyn Museum , opens in June with a series of special events followed closely by the programmatic highlight of the year, the 2011 Art + Environment Conference.

    Founded in 1931 as a small volunteer-run art gallery, the Nevada Museum of Art has evolved over the years into a nationally recognized art museum thanks to the unending support of the community. The exhibition A Lasting Legacy: Church, Cutts, and the Founding of the Nevada Museum of Art , on display August 27, 2011 - January 29, 2012, explores the history of the institution and tells the story of its founders – Dr. James Church and Charles Cutts. A University of Nevada, Reno professor of the classics and recognized for his scientific research into snow surveying on Mt. Rose, Dr. Church was a great advocate for the arts and convinced his friend Cutts to bequeath his entire art collection to the burgeoning community art museum. With art collections ranging from Native American baskets and nineteenth century landscape paintings, to Altered Landscape photography and an ever-expanding contemporary art collection, the Museum recognizes that what sets it apart from other institutions is its thematic focus inspired by Dr. Church in 1931 – of examining how humans interact with natural, built and virtual environments through the Museum’s unique Center For Art + Environment.

    “The Museums’ 80th Anniversary Year is both a celebration of our institution’s accomplishments and the anticipation of what is to come,” said David B. Walker, Executive Director | CEO, Nevada Museum of Art. “We can’t wait to unleash this year’s exhibitions, including the light sculptures of New York-based artist Leo Villareal and our first Egyptian antiquities show with mummies and sarcophagi. Especially important to the Museum is the year-end exhibition and accompanying Rizzoli publication featuring works from our own Altered Landscape photography collection, a collection that has been lovingly developed over the past twenty years. Using this incredible exhibition line-up we aim capture the imaginations and hearts of the community and launch the Museum into its next decade of growth,” continued Walker. “As our mission statement indicates We are a Museum of Ideas and 2011 is our year of ambition.”

    As the only accredited art museum in the state, the Museum plays a vital role by providing the opportunity for people to encounter, engage and enjoy a diversity of art experiences. A private, non-profit organization, the Museum serves the needs of more than 80,000 people per year, including 8,000 school children through the generosity of its community, membership, sponsors and foundations. In March 2011, the Museum launches a year-long public image campaign based on audience participation and community engagement. The year also rings special for the dedicated partnerships that have been formed over the years including Great Basin Brewery who celebrate the occasion with a special brew to be served at the Museum’s monthly First Thursday events.

    80TH ANNIVERSARY YEAR EXHIBITION LINE-UP

    Jacob Hashimoto: Here in Sleep, a World, Muted to a Whisper
    November 16 2010 – December 31, 2011

    In anticipation of the Museum’s 80th Anniversary Year, contemporary artist Jacob Hashimoto was commissioned to create a large-scale, site-specific artwork now hanging in the Donald W. Reynolds Grand Hall. Here in Sleep, a World, Muted to a Whisper is fabricated from thousands of small “kites” made of bamboo-stiffened rice papers and dedicated to the Museum’s Volunteers in Art (VIA).


    Leo Villareal: Animating Light
    March 5 – May 22, 2011

    Recognized as the greatest light sculptor of his generation, Leo Villareal’s hypnotic and exhilarating light sculptures are appreciated by both the young and old, experienced and inexperienced art viewers, students of both the arts and sciences, and engineers who attempt to analyze the artist’s algorithms. Villareal’s work boasts strong ties to the northern Nevada region as his work with lights stem from his first experience at the Burning Man festival in the Black Rock Desert in 1994 which led him to his ultimate medium – light.

    To Live Forever: Egyptian Treasures from the Brooklyn Museum
    June 11- September 4, 2011

    The Museum’s ability to stage spectacular exhibitions will be evident with To Live Forever: Egyptian Treasures from the Brooklyn Museum . This international exhibition will attract crowds of all ages with 120 remarkable Egyptian artifacts— mummies, sarcophagi, jewelry, and figurines—on display and layered with celebratory and educational programming that will make Summer 2011 a memorable one. To Live Forever is drawn entirely from the Brooklyn Museum’s astonishing Egyptian collection and ranges in date from 3650 BCE to 365 CE.

    A 50-foot steel pyramid is scheduled for construction in the parking lot of the Museum in celebration of the line-up of Egyptian-themed 80th anniversary events taking place in June. The pyramid, built by Reno-based architecture firm Cathexes, will be dismantled and shipped to Burning Man in late August for display. It will be the first ever art-work from a Museum to be taken to the annual arts and culture event. Made of Museum members, businesses and stakeholders, a unique 80 for 80 Host Committee has been developed and are generously funding a portion of To Live Forever: Egyptian Treasures from the Brooklyn Museum . Also providing sponsorship support for the Pyramid Party, this committee is the first of its kind to be formed in support of an exhibition and event.

    Long-time Museum partner Great Basin Brewing Company will brew a limited-edition lager to serve at Museum’s First Thursday event beginning in April. “Dr. Church’s Living Room Lager” is named for the Museum’s founder, a scientist and art collector who invited friends, colleagues, and collectors into his home in the 1930’s to discover and discuss art. With hints of juniper berry as homage to Dr. Church’s explorations of Mount Rose, the lager is brewed in keeping with beer recipes of the Prohibition era. “Dr. Church’s Living Room Lager” will be available on tap at both the Reno and Sparks Great Basin Brewery locations and will be served at Café Musée. A limited edition will be bottled for sale as well.


    EGYPT-THEMED EVENTS
    • An Evening on Pharaoh’s Barge / Thursday, June 16
    In recognition of the corporations and individuals who have sponsored To Live Forever , the Museum hosts a private gala themed as an evening on a Pharaoh’s barge, offering guests the opportunity to experience ancient Egypt through fine dining, music, décor and entertainment. This elegant evening will also recognize longtime Museum supporter Charles N. Mathewson for his recent gift to endow the position of Curator of Education.

    • Pyramid Party / Friday, June 17
    Guarded and greeted by Egyptian gods of the underworld, Anubis and Apis, guests will travel back through time to the romanticized era of archeology and exploration. A bountiful feast will be provided, and guests can indulge in the hookah lounge and fortune telling before experiencing a variety of live performances. Tickets will be available April 2011.

    • Egyptian Birthday Bazaar / Saturday, June 18
    Inspired by Cairo’s bustling street bazaar, the community is invited to celebrate the Museum’s 80th Anniversary with Museum members, family and friends. The Museum will be transformed into a lively marketplace complete with live music, roving entertainers and authentic Egyptian giftware and jewelry for sale.

    • Night at the Museum / Saturday, July 16
    This summer sleepover for kids ages 7-12 features an entire night of family-friendly activities including flashlight tours, snacks, and a film. Kids can explore the unknown world of ancient Egypt while staring down the mask of a real Egyptian mummy.

    The Altered Landscape: Photographs of a Changing Environment
    September 24, 2011 - January 8, 2012

    An exhibition that captures the year’s two-fold objective perfectly is the Fall 2011 exhibition, The Altered Landscape: Photographs of a Changing Environment . The culminating exhibition of the 80th Anniversary Year, The Altered Landscape celebrates the institution’s signature photography collection in a thought-provoking exploration of human interaction and intervention with the environment. This exhibition exemplifies the Museum’s future in growing its standing as the international nexus for dialogue surrounding the field of art and environment.

    The Altered Landscape exhibition will be accompanied by a comprehensive, 288-page deluxe publication published by Rizzoli that examines the collection’s roots in the 1970s New Topographics movement and highlights recent photographic acquisitions in this rapidly changing field. The book, titled The Altered Landscape will be internationally distributed by Random House, Inc. and available for sale in the Museum Store September 2011.

    The 2011 Art + Environment Conference, scheduled for September 29 through October 1, is a flagship program of the Museum's Center for Art + Environment and brings together artists, scholars, designers, scientists, and writers for a dialogue surrounding ideas about human interactions with global environments. During the Conference, the Museum's galleries will also house the Art + Environment Season of exhibitions including: Landscape Futures: Instruments, Devices and Architectural Inventions (Aug. 13, 2011 – Feb. 12, 2012); Helen Mayer Harrison & Newton Harrison - Sierra Nevada: An Adaptation (Sept. 3 – Dec. 4, 2011); This is Not a Trojan Horse: A Project by Amy Franceschini and Mike Davis (Sept. 3 – Oct. 1, 2011); and Richard Black: Australia’s Murray River (Sept. 29 – Dec. 31, 2011).

    The Museum’s 80th Anniversary in 2011 is a celebration both of its past and of its future. Featuring an ambitious line-up of world-class exhibitions, an internationally recognized conference and the premiere feature exhibition of its signature collection, the Museum has much to celebrate.

    ####

    The Nevada Museum of Art is a museum of ideas. The only accredited art museum in the state, it is a private, non-profit organization supported by the generosity of its membership as well as by sponsorships and grants. Through creative programming and scholarship, the Museum provides the opportunity for people to encounter, engage and enjoy a diversity of art experiences. The Museum is open Wednesday through Sunday, 10 am to 5 pm, late on Thursdays until 8 pm. The galleries, Museum Store and Café Musée are closed on Mondays, Tuesdays and national holidays. Admission is FREE for members, $10 General Admission, $8 Student / Senior, $1 children 6 to 12 years and free for children 5 and under. Museum Membership starts at just $25.

    SPONSORSHIP
    Major sponsorship for Jacob Hashimoto: Here in Sleep, a World, Muted to a Whisper is provided by Volunteers in Art (VIA) and the Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts.

    Leo Villareal: Animating Light was organized by the San Jose Museum of Art. Sponsored by the Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, the Walter and Karla Goldschmidt Foundation, and Bank of America. Sponsorship of the Nevada Museum of Art presentation is provided by Bally Technologies, Robert and Eleanor Preger, and the Stremmel Gallery. Additional funding provided by City of Reno Arts and Culture Commission and the Nevada Arts Council, a state agency, and the National Endowment for the Arts, a federal agency.

    To Live Forever: Egyptian Treasures from the Brooklyn Museum has been organized by the Brooklyn Museum. Lead sponsorship for this exhibition is provided by I. Heidi Loeb Hegerich, Goldcorp, USA and Wells Fargo. Major sponsorship provided by Mark E Pollack Foundation. Funding provided by the Nevada Arts Council, a state agency, and the National Endowment for the Arts, a federal agency.


    The Nevada Museum of Art gratefully acknowledges the following supporters for their enthusiastic support of The Altered Landscape: Photographs of a Changing Landscape . Major Sponsor: Carol Franc Buck Foundation; Sponsors: National Endowment for the Arts, Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Wilhelm and Elke Hoppe Living Trust; Generous Supporters: The Robert Mapplethorpe Foundation, Atlantis Casino Resort and Spa, Daniel Greenberg and Susan Steinhauser, Maureen Mullarkey, Kathie Bartlett; Additional Support: Cultural Services of the French Embassy, New York. Grants for equipment and technology from the following organizations also made this project possible: The Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS), Western States Arts Federation (WESTAF) with the Nevada Arts Council and the National Endowment for the Arts.

    » Images & Citations

    <em>A Lasting Legacy: Church, Cutts, and the Founding of the Nevada Museum of Art</em>, on display August 27, 2011 - January 29, 2012
    <em>A Lasting Legacy: Church, Cutts, and the Founding of the Nevada Museum of Art</em>, on display August 27, 2011 - January 29, 2012

    <em>Jacob Hashimoto: Here in Sleep, a World, Muted to a Whisper</em>, November 16 2010 – December 31, 2011
    <em>Jacob Hashimoto: Here in Sleep, a World, Muted to a Whisper</em>, November 16 2010 – December 31, 2011

    <em>Leo Villareal: Animating Light</em>, March 5 – May 22, 2011
    <em>Leo Villareal: Animating Light</em>, March 5 – May 22, 2011

    <em>To Live Forever: Egyptian Treasures from the Brooklyn Museum</em>, June 11- September 4, 2011
    <em>To Live Forever: Egyptian Treasures from the Brooklyn Museum</em>, June 11- September 4, 2011

    <em>The Altered Landscape: Photographs of a Changing Environment</em>, September 24, 2011 - January 8, 2012
    <em>The Altered Landscape: Photographs of a Changing Environment</em>, September 24, 2011 - January 8, 2012

    » Events & Programs

    • Art + Environment Conference - SEPT. 29 - OCT.1

      Thursday September 29, 2011 / 7:00 pm – 6:30 pm

      The Art + Environment Conference at the Nevada Museum of Art reaches across continents, disciplines, and media to unite a dynamic group of thinkers shaping ideas about human interactions with global environments.

      Each conference registration ticket includes: access to the complete Conference program, complimentary admission to The Altered Landscape: Photographs of a Changing Environment Members’ Premiere and Welcome Reception on Thursday, September 29, Closing Reception, and food and beverage provided during select breaks.

      To qualify for advance registration, conference tickets must be purchased on or before May 13, 2011. General registration is $500 for conference tickets purchased May 14 through September 29, 2011.



  • THE SCIENCE OF LIGHT AND THE POWER OF ART



    » Press Release

    March 15, 2011 - The Nevada Museum of Art welcomes New York-based artist Leo Villareal – the most prominent light sculptor of his generation – to the Museum on March 5, 2011 for the opening of his exhibition Leo Villareal: Animating Light , featuring more than 20 of his immersive interactive light sculptures consisting of strobes, neon, and LED bulbs activated by his own custom-made software. On view March 6 through May 22, the exhibition has proven its appeal to viewers of all ages, experienced and inexperienced art viewers, those fascinated by both the arts and sciences, and engineers who will be tempted to analyze the artist’s algorithms.

    A pioneer in the use of LEDs and computer-driven imagery, Leo Villareal is known for creating immersive experiences both within gallery spaces and outside architectural environments. At the Nevada Museum of Art, Villareal’s works will be displayed across three floors of the institution including the first floor Reynolds Grand Hall and atrium, the second floor Media Gallery, and the 6,500 square foot Feature Gallery located on the third floor.

    Villareal is acclaimed for successfully bridging the subculture of technology with the broader international contemporary art world, an idea which developed out of his experience at the annual Burning Man celebration in Nevada’s Black Rock desert. For instance, thousands of tiny white LEDs in a single work may resemble a starry night as seen in a planetarium, while tubes of colored LEDs masked by a diffuser are reminiscent a Monet painting of water lilies set in motion.

    “Leo Villareal: Animating Light is the first major technology-based exhibition that has been presented in an arts venue in northern Nevada,” commented Ann M. Wolfe, Curator of Exhibitions and Collections at the Nevada Museum of Art. “The Museum is thrilled to show Villareal’s works especially because they relate directly to the Museum’s inherent focus on art and environment. Villareal’s installations respond and activate the architectural environments they occupy, while creating virtual environments that are both hypnotic and exhilarating.”

    The Museum’s Media Gallery will feature a single work titled Firmament which is accompanied by four “couches” designed to de-sensitize the viewer to space and gravity while experiencing the piece. The Museum’s Feature Gallery will be minimally lit in order to allow the works to define their own environments and viewers to “lose themselves” while exploring them. A looped video accompanies the exhibition in the Feature Gallery, highlighting some of the architectural works Villareal has created over the past 15 years including his 2008 piece Multiverse , a wall and ceiling installation involving 41,000 computer-controlled LEDs at Washington D.C.’s National Gallery of Art, where a 200-foot-long hallway billows with illuminated data clouds.

    In 1994 Leo Villareal began an internship working on a project incorporating virtual reality technology led by artist Michael Naimark. That same summer, friends encouraged him to attend the annual Burning Man celebration in Nevada’s Black Rock desert with thousands of like-minded individuals—many of them with a creative, technological bent—who come together to form the annual experimental community championing self-reliance and radical self-expression while featuring large-scale interactive art installations. Leaving his tent to explore Burning Man’s flat, ancient lakebed after nightfall, Villareal lost his bearings and was compelled to relearn how to navigate. The experience recalled the look of virtual reality, computer graphics, or early video games, characterized by rudimentary, flat, featureless land and sky.

    In the summer of 1997, before heading back to the playa, Villareal constructed a wooden grid framework to which he attached sixteen strobe lights, programmed to turn on and off in sequence which he mounted atop his camper at Burning Man. Visible from miles away, it functioned as a way finding device, but it was also much more. Its blinking lights seemed to communicate nonverbally to audiences both on the playa and back in his art studio. Villareal had found his medium. The exhibition Animating Light reveals just how far his light sculptures have evolved from his first Burning man experience.

    SPECIAL EVENTS
    WORKSHOP Circuit Bending
    Saturday March 19 / 10:00 am – 2:00 pm
    The Museum's Teen Art Council, along with the Holland Project, present a one-day workshop where music creativity is explored through hands-on re-engineering of electronic toys and musical instruments. This workshop is designed for teens. Cost is $5 for all students.

    PERFORMING LEO VILLAREAL: DJ Set by Terrain, a.k.a David Bobzien
    Thursday, March 24 / 6:00 pm – 7:30 pm
    Leo Villareal’s light sculptures and installations come to life through sounds and music mixed in a DJ set by Terrain, a.k.a David Bobzien, Nevada Assembly Representative District 24. David Bobzien’s is first in a series of programs meant to interpret Villareal’s work through performances in spring 2011. Café Musée will serve light dinners, drinks, coffees, and desserts during the performances until 7 pm. $10 / $8 Museum members

    ART BITE: Crimson Rose on Leo Villareal and Burning Man
    Friday, March 25 / 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm
    Artist Leo Villareal’s light installations count Burning Man in Nevada’s Black Rock Desert among their inspirations. Join Burning Man Art Director Crimson Rose for an exciting exploration of the relationship between Leo Villareal’s work and Burning Man. Funded in part by Nevada Humanities. $5 / $4 Museum members

    PERFORMING LEO VILLAREAL: Composer Jean-Paul Perrotte’s Electronic Score in Dialogue with Villareal
    Thursday, April 28 / 6 pm
    Perrotte’s improvisational electronic score responds to the patterns of light manifested by the computer codes of Villareal’s light sculptures. Café Musée will serve light dinners, drinks, coffees, and desserts during the performances until 7 pm. $10 / $8 Museum members

    PERFORMING LEO VILLAREAL: Cari Cunningham Choreographs a Modern Dance in the Gallery
    Thursday, May 19 / 6 pm
    Cunningham’s dance choreography activates the physical space of the gallery by engaging Villareal’s light sculptures and installations through movement and music. Café Musée will serve light dinners, drinks, coffees, and desserts during the performances until 7 pm. $10 / $8 Museum members

    SPONSORSHIP
    Leo Villareal: Animating Light was organized by the San Jose Museum of Art. Sponsored by the Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, the Walter and Karla Goldschmidt Foundation, and Bank of America. Sponsorship of the Nevada Museum of Art presentation is provided by Bally Technologies, Robert and Eleanor Preger and the Stremmel Gallery. Additional funding provided by City of Reno Arts and Culture Commission and the Nevada Arts Council, a state agency, and the National Endowment for the Arts, a federal agency.

    Leo Villareal: Animating Light will be exhibited March 6 through May 22, 2011 at the Nevada Museum of Art, Donald W. Reynolds Center for the Visual Arts, E. L. Wiegand Gallery located at 160 West Liberty Street in downtown Reno. The Museum is open Wednesday through Sunday. Cost: Museum members free; $10 adults; $8 students/seniors; $1 children 6 – 12; free for children five and under. For more information, please call 775.329.3333 or visit www.nevadaart.org.

    ####

    The Nevada Museum of Art is a museum of ideas. The only accredited art museum in the state, it is a private, non-profit organization supported by the generosity of its membership as well as by sponsorships and grants. Through creative programming and scholarship, the Museum provides the opportunity for people to encounter, engage and enjoy a diversity of art experiences. The Museum is open Wednesday through Sunday, 10 am to 5 pm, late on Thursdays until 8 pm. The galleries, Museum Store and Café Musée are closed on Mondays, Tuesdays and national holidays. Admission is FREE for members, $10 General Admission, $8 Student / Senior, $1 children 6 to 12 years and free for children 5 and under. Museum Membership starts at just $25.

    » Images & Citations

    Leo Villareal, <em>Big Bang</em>, 2008. LEDs, aluminum, custom software, and electrical hardware, 59 x 59 x 8 inches. Courtesy of the Conner Contemporary Art, Washington, DC. Image courtesy of the artist and the San Jose Museum of Art.
    Leo Villareal, <em>Big Bang</em>, 2008. LEDs, aluminum, custom software, and electrical hardware, 59 x 59 x 8 inches. Courtesy of the Conner Contemporary Art, Washington, DC. Image courtesy of the artist and the San Jose Museum of Art.

    Leo Villareal, <em>Flag</em>, 2008. LED tubes, custom software, and mixed media, 74 1/2 x 144 x 4 inches. Unique. Courtesy Gering & López Gallery. Image courtesy of the artist and the San Jose Museum of Art.
    Leo Villareal, <em>Flag</em>, 2008. LED tubes, custom software, and mixed media, 74 1/2 x 144 x 4 inches. Unique. Courtesy Gering & López Gallery. Image courtesy of the artist and the San Jose Museum of Art.

    Leo Villareal, <em>Amanecer</em>, 2007. LEDs, custom software, diffusion material, wood, electrical wiring, and hardware, 84 x 288 x 15 inches. Collection of Javier López, Madrid. Image courtesy of the artist and the San Jose Museum of
    Leo Villareal, <em>Amanecer</em>, 2007. LEDs, custom software, diffusion material, wood, electrical wiring, and hardware, 84 x 288 x 15 inches. Collection of Javier López, Madrid. Image courtesy of the artist and the San Jose Museum of

    » Events & Programs

    • Watch Us Glow: Teen Art Night

      Friday April 1, 2011 / 7:00 pm – 9:00 pm

      The Nevada Museum of Art's Teen Art Council and the Holland Project present the third annual Teen Art Night. Teens are invited for an exciting evening featuring live local bands, a photo booth, a hands on glow-in-the-dark workshop, and screenings of 3-minute films created by local youth filmmakers. Teens will have access to the galleries and can view the Scholastic Art Awards exhibition featuring award winning artwork by Northern Nevada middle and high school students.

    • Circuit Bending Workshop

      Saturday March 19, 2011 / 10:00 am – 2:00 pm

      The Museum's Teen Art Council, along with the Holland Project, present a one-day workshop where music creativity is explored through hands-on re-engineering of electronic toys and musical instruments. This workshop is designed for teens.

    • Opening Lecture: Leo Villareal on Animating Light

      Saturday March 5, 2011 / 5:00 pm – 6:00 pm

      Join the Museum in welcoming internationally-renowned artist Leo Villareal to the premiere of Leo Villareal: Animating Light. The artist, whose work is represented in some of the world’s most prominent museum and gallery collections, invites participants to learn about the nature of light and experience through his dynamic, immersive light sculptures and installations.

      THIS EVENT IS SOLD OUT, but there will be a free first-come, first-served simulcast in the Founders Room. Tickets for the simulcast will be available at the admissions desk on March 5 only. Seating is limited.

    • Crimson Rose on Leo Villareal and Burning Man

      Friday March 25, 2011 / 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm

      Artist Leo Villareal’s light installations count Burning Man in Nevada’s Black Rock Desert among their inspirations. Join Burning Man Art Director Crimson Rose for an exciting exploration of the relationship between Leo Villareal’s work and Burning Man. The Art Bite series is funded in part by Nevada Humanities.

    • DJ Set by Terrain, a.k.a David Bobzien

      Thursday March 24, 2011 / 6:00 pm – 7:30 pm

      Leo Villareal’s light sculptures and installations come to life through sounds and music mixed in a DJ set by Terrain, a.k.a David Bobzien, Nevada Assemblyman, District 24.

      This is the first in a series of three programs designed to interpret Villareal’s work through performances in spring 2011. Café Musee will serve light dinners, drinks, coffees and desserts during the performances until 7pm.

      Download the menu (PDF)

    • Leo Villareal: Animating Light

      Saturday March 5, 2011 / 6:00 pm – 8:00 pm

      It is sure to be a party at the premiere of Leo Villareal: Animating Light. Meet the artist and experience his vibrant light-based artworks, accompanied by the beats of DJ James Healy (Escape Art) live in the atrium. Come and be dazzled by Reno’s-own Controlled Burn and BoHoHoops. Celebrate the artist’s place of inspiration by wearing your favorite burner costume outfitted with LEDs. Admission is free for members with valid member card. Kids Open Art Studio is available from 6 – 8 pm / $4. Non-members may attend for the general Museum admission price.

    • Meet the Curator: JoAnne Northrup on Leo Villareal: Animating Light

      Friday April 8, 2011 / 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm

      Experience Animating Light through a curator’s eyes. Join the Museum in welcoming San Jose Museum of Art Senior Curator JoAnne Northrup for a gallery talk about Leo Villareal: Animating Light, which Nothrup organized. Book signing to follow.

    • Performing Leo Villareal: Composer Jean-Paul Perrotte’s Electronic Score in Dialogue with Villareal

      Thursday April 28, 2011 / 6:00 pm – 8:00 pm

      Perrotte’s improvisational electronic score responds to the patterns of light manifested by the computer codes of Villareal’s light sculptures. This is the second in a series of three programs designed to interpret Villareal’s work through performances in spring 2011. Café Musée will serve light dinners, drinks, coffees, and desserts during the performances until 7:30 pm.

      Download the night's Cafe Musee menu (PDF)

    • Performing Leo Villareal: Cari Cunningham Choreographs a Modern Dance in the Gallery

      Thursday May 19, 2011 / 6:00 pm – 6:40 pm

      Cunningham’s dance choreography activates the physical space of the gallery by engaging Villareal’s light sculptures and installations through movement and music. This is the third in a series of three programs designed to interpret Villareal’s work through performances in spring 2011. Café Musée will serve light dinners, drinks, coffees, and desserts during the performances until 7 pm.

      Download the menu (PDF)



  • EVERY SECOND SATURDAY AT THE NEVADA MUSEUM OF ART IS FREE IN 2011



    » Press Release

    March 11, 2011 - The Nevada Museum of Art is excited to confirm the launch of the 2011 Second Saturdays are free thanks to the Nightingale Family Foundation program, generously sponsored by the Nightingale Family Foundation. Following the success of the pilot program in 2010, Second Saturdays has been designed to increase the Museum’s outreach to families across the Reno-Tahoe community, increase cultural awareness and education, and further develop the region’s exposure to the arts.

    Second Saturdays offer northern Nevada families, individuals and visitors the chance to visit the Museum for free and experience the wide range of exhibitions on display, and learn about the educational programs and unique activities on offer throughout the year. As part of the Second Saturdays program, guests have the chance to speak with trained Museum docents on-hand to share information about the exhibitions and the Museum, while answering questions about the E.L. Cord Museum School, activities and programs at the Museum, Gallery Tours, special events, and more.

    "We at the Nightingale Family Foundation are privileged to have the chance to sponsor the free Second Saturdays at the Nevada Museum of Art,” said Steven Nightingale of the Nightingale Family Foundation. “The Museum is a place of energy, beauty, and community, a place for all of us to gather. I urge everyone to visit. In our difficult times, it is where we might go for trustworthy joys, for peace, for learning, for contemplation.”

    The 2011 Second Saturdays program launched with Explorer, Naturalist, Artist: John James Audubon and The Birds of America and continues throughout 2011:
    • March 12 / April 9 / May 14: Leo Villareal: Animating Light
    Thousands of LEDs and just one artist…the world’s most prominent light sculptor in his first museum survey.
    • June 11 / July 9 / August 13: To Live Forever: Egyptian Treasures from the Brooklyn Museum
    Mummies, scarabs and sarcophagi, oh my!
    • September 10: A Lasting Legacy: Church, Cutts and the Founding of the Nevada Museum of Art
    Learn about the beginnings of the Nevada Museum of Art and the founding fathers responsible for starting it.
    • October 8 / November 12 / December 10: The Altered landscape: Photographs of a Changing Environment
    Discover how we humans interact with our environments and the landscape.

    Seconds Saturdays take place the second Saturday of each month in 2011 at the Nevada Museum of Art, Donald W. Reynolds Center for the Visual Arts, E. L. Wiegand Gallery located at 160 West Liberty Street in downtown Reno. The Museum is open Wednesday through Sunday. Admission is always FREE for members and on Second Saturdays. General admission is $10, $8 Student / Senior, $1 children 6 to 12 years and free for children 5 and under. Museum Membership starts at just $25. For more information, please call 775.329.3333 or visit www.nevadaart.org.

    ####
    The Nevada Museum of Art is a museum of ideas. The only accredited art museum in the state, it is a private, non-profit organization supported by the generosity of its membership as well as by sponsorships and grants. Through creative programming and scholarship, the Museum provides the opportunity for people to encounter, engage and enjoy a diversity of art experiences. The Museum is open Wednesday through Sunday, 10 am to 5 pm, late on Thursdays until 8 pm. The galleries, Museum Store and Café Musée are closed on Mondays, Tuesdays and national holidays. Admission is FREE for members, $10 General Admission, $8 Student / Senior, $1 children 6 to 12 years and free for children 5 and under. Museum Membership starts at just $25.

    » Events & Programs

    • Second Saturday is FREE

      Saturday April 9, 2011 / 10:00 am – 5:00 pm

      Second Saturdays are FREE at the Nevada Museum of Art, throughout 2011! Come meet the staff, interact with the exhibitions and learn about the educational programs and unique activities we offer to our community. Don't miss out on this wonderful opportunity to share the Museum with family and friends!

    • Second Saturdays are FREE

      Saturday March 12, 2011 / 10:00 am – 5:00 pm

      Second Saturdays are FREE at the Nevada Museum of Art, throughout 2011! Come meet the staff, interact with the exhibitions and learn about the educational programs and unique activities we offer to our community. Don't miss out on this wonderful opportunity to share the Museum with family and friends!



  • NORTHERN NEVADA CRAFTSMAN GREG DRINKWINE FEATURED AT THE NEVADA MUSEUM OF ART



    » Press Release

    March 11, 2011 - Nevada-based craftsman Greg Drinkwine’s work will be showcased in a first-ever frame exhibition, Triumph of Craftsmanship: Arts and Crafts Frames by Greg Drinkwine , at the Nevada Museum of Art from April 2 through August 7, 2011. A nationally-recognized frame-maker, Drinkwine has created numerous frames for artworks in private and museum collections across the country.

    Since 2005, Drinkwine and his team of craftsman have been hand-carving frames from his studio in Gardnerville, Nevada, dedicated to making superior quality frames using centuries-old techniques and finest-quality materials such as 22-carat gold. Drinkwine is often called upon to design and carve period frames when original frames are no longer in optimal condition. Among his clients are the Crocker Art Museum in Sacramento and the Coeur D ' Alene Art Auction held annually in Reno, Nevada, both of which require museum-quality frames for the artworks they handle.

    Drinkwine specializes in making frames from the late-nineteenth through early twentieth century—an era popularly known as the Arts and Crafts period. For this exhibition, Drinkwine will carve frames representative of those once made by well-known frame makers such as James McNeill Whistler, Stanford White, Herman Dudley Murphy, and others.

    “Creating a frame requires far more than the skills we have as craftsmen,” states Drinkwine. “My team and I spend hours researching and studying original blueprints and plans to create a true replica frame by hand. We are thrilled to have this exhibition at the Museum to celebrate the craftsmanship that goes into each of these frames – some of which house the world’s greatest works of art.”

    “Greg’s frames epitomize the Arts and Crafts era,” comments Ann M. Wolfe, Curator of Exhibitions and Collections at the Nevada Museum of Art. “The frames transport the viewer back to a time when fine craftsmanship was deeply revered. This exhibition is a celebration of the dedication and creativity of the arts and crafts era.”

    The Museum will retain four of Drinkwine’s frames for permanent collection artworks that are in need of historically-accurate frames.

    Triumph of Craftsmanship: Arts and Crafts Frames by Greg Drinkwine will be exhibited April 2 through August 7, 2011
    at the Nevada Museum of Art, Donald W. Reynolds Center for the Visual Arts, E. L. Wiegand Gallery located at 160 West Liberty Street in downtown Reno. The Museum is open Wednesday through Sunday. Cost: Museum members free; $10 adults; $8 students/seniors; $1 children 6 – 12; free for children five and under. For more information, please call 775.329.3333 or visit www.nevadaart.org.

    SPONSORSHIP
    Exclusive sponsorship for Triumph of Craftsmanship: Arts and Crafts Frames by Greg Drinkwine provided by Wells Fargo.

    ####
    The Nevada Museum of Art is a museum of ideas. The only accredited art museum in the state, it is a private, non-profit organization supported by the generosity of its membership as well as by sponsorships and grants. Through creative programming and scholarship, the Museum provides the opportunity for people to encounter, engage and enjoy a diversity of art experiences. The Museum is open Wednesday through Sunday, 10 am to 5 pm, late on Thursdays until 8 pm. The galleries, Museum Store and Café Musée are closed on Mondays, Tuesdays and national holidays. Admission is FREE for members, $10 General Admission, $8 Student / Senior, $1 children 6 to 12 years and free for children 5 and under. Museum Membership starts at just $25.

    » Events & Programs



  • SIERRA NEVADA: AN ADAPTATION, A FORCE MAJEURE PROJECT BY HELEN AND NEWTON HARRISON



    » Press Release

    January 26, 2011 - Reno, NV –The internationally-renowned ecological artists, Helen and Newton Harrison, have teamed with the Center for Art + Environment at the Nevada Museum of Art to create new work for their ongoing endeavor the Force Majeure , a series of land-based artworks responding to the challenges of global change. Titled Sierra Nevada: An Adaptation , the current project is a continuation of the great-scale environmental remedies the Harrisons have proposed since 2004, including Peninsula Europe, 2007 .

    Sierra Nevada: An Adaptation seeks an adaptive response to the predicted temperature rise in the high grounds of the Sierra Nevada mountain range, located between California and Nevada. The rise – that may be as much as 5ºC/9ºF during the next century – is expected to generate both drought and flood in the mountains, and change the habitat of numerous species.

    “We believe that a Sierra Nevada response in the ‘now,’ of the kind we propose, can forestall the great social and economic difficulties that the predicted rise in temperatures will cause, while at the same time generate a badly needed new botanically-based industry,” state the Harrisons. “Essentially, we're arguing to design from a highly probable future backward to the immediately knowable present.”

    In collaboration with the Center for Art + Environment, the Harrisons will choose sites in each of the seventeen major watersheds within the Sierra Nevada and craft specific responses to each, ensuring that species replacement will be beneficial. Proposed responses range from passive monitoring to removal of invasive species. Some cases may require the assisted migration of certain species to insure biodiversity. or modifying the cultural landscape of the watersheds to support sustainable grazing and forestry while sequestering water. The Nature Conservancy has contributed the conceptual use of Independence Lake in California and its watershed for the initial stage of the project.

    The first project exhibition, to premiere at Ronald Feldman Fine Arts in New York, February 10 through March 12, will include a 44-foot long floor photograph of the entire Sierra Nevada mountain range created by the Nevada-based Desert Research Institute (DRI) with drawing and markings made by the Harrisons and their assistants. “The intention of this rather large image is to give the viewer a feeling of flying over the range, as well as one of walking the range,” stated the Harrisons. The image will have two drain basins accentuated, Independence Lake and the Truckee River watershed going east, and the adjacent Yuba River watershed flowing west.

    The Harrisons and the DRI are also creating digital drawings of the seventeen watersheds, with notes on the restoration work already being done in each of them. A three-part digital animation of the Independence Lake drain basin will project possible consequences over decades of neglect, intervening to assist the growth of beneficial species, and designing a multi-layered cultural landscape. A second version of the map will be exhibited at the Nevada Museum of Art’s Art + Environment Conference in September 2011, and new materials will be developed further for a larger Nevada Museum of Art exhibition in several years. All archive materials for Sierra Nevada: An Adaptation are being collected for the Museum’s Center for Art + Environment Archive.
    ####
    The Nevada Museum of Art is a museum of ideas. The only accredited art museum in the state, it is a private, non-profit organization supported by the generosity of its membership as well as by sponsorships and grants. Through creative programming and scholarship, the Museum provides the opportunity for people to encounter, engage and enjoy a diversity of art experiences. The Center for Art + Environment (CA+E) at the Nevada Museum of Art is an internationally recognized research center that supports the practice, study and awareness of creative interactions between people and their natural, built, and virtual environments.

    » Images & Citations

    Helen and Newton Harrison, Truckee-Yuba Rivers Divide. © 2010 Jeff Erickson.
    Helen and Newton Harrison, Truckee-Yuba Rivers Divide. © 2010 Jeff Erickson.


  • CELEBRATED WATERCOLOR PAINTER FEATURED AT THE NEVADA MUSEUM OF ART



    » Press Release

    January 25, 2011 - Reno, Nev. (Oct. 31, 2010) – Rooted in the watercolor tradition of European and American art, Timothy J. Clark’s paintings of quiet outdoor landscapes and indoor spaces capture light’s journey as it flows between inside and outside spaces, and between cause and effect. Expressive Luminescence: Watercolors by Timothy J. Clark , guest curated by art historian and professor Gene Cooper, surveys approximately 20 of Clark’s works at the Nevada Museum of Art December 18, 2010 to April 24, 2011.

    Throughout European and American art history there have been artists who have explored light as it moves between interior and exterior spaces. From Jan Vermeer to Andrew Wyeth, select artists have analyzed the transforming effects of natural light as it animates inanimate architectural interiors. Clark vitalizes both ordinary and extraordinary architectural spaces with a dramatic force that transforms them into gentle metaphors.

    Clark often begins with a quiet, comfortable subject like a domestic interior or an intimate woodworking shop, and through his use of formal light transforms it into an elegant symbol of a facet of middleclass life. In the spirit of American painter John Singer Sargent, Clark’s clear-eyed light streams inside through windows, archways, and doors. The weight and substance of materiality is replaced with an atmosphere that interjects a vital pulse into an otherwise lifeless interior. Clark sometimes selects early church interiors that are animated with exotic lighting effects, especially those that contain a mix of flickering candle light and a luminous glow resonating from gold-leafed altars. Like Rembrandt, his dramatic light penetrates the rich darkness of the interior core evoking a sense of mysterious presence.

    Clark’s works have been acquired by many private and public institutions, including the National Portrait Gallery, the Butler Institute of American Art, and the Farnsworth Art Museum. Since 1994 he has taught at the Art Students League in New York, and he often lectures at such institutions as the Worcester Museum of art, the National Academy School of Fine Arts, and the Yale University School of Architecture’s graduate summer workshop in Rome. Clark travels regularly between his homes in California and Maine, as well as trips to New York City and across Europe.

    “Painting is a solitary profession,” says Timothy J. Clark. “For me, the contentment of the stony silence of the studio is wonderfully contrasted by the interpretations and personal responses of viewers and collectors, whose participation is pivotal in completing the creative process.”

    Guest curator Gene Cooper lives in Laguna Beach, California. Currently Professor Emeritus at Cal State Long Beach, Mr. Cooper is known for his multiple exhibitions on California painter Wayne Thiebaud, including recent retrospective exhibitions at the Laguna Art Museum, Utah Museum of Fine Arts, Denver Art Museum and Palm Springs Art Museum. His publishing credentials range from monographs and essays to contributions for ArtNews .

    Expressive Luminescence: Watercolors by Timothy J. Clark will be exhibited December 18, 2010 through April 24, 2011
    at the Nevada Museum of Art, Donald W. Reynolds Center for the Visual Arts, E. L. Wiegand Gallery located at 160 West Liberty Street in downtown Reno. The Museum is open Wednesday through Sunday. Cost: Museum members free; $10 adults; $8 students/seniors; $1 children 6 – 12; free for children five and under. For more information, please call 775.329.3333 or visit www.nevadaart.org.

    ####
    The Nevada Museum of Art is a museum of ideas. The only accredited art museum in the state, it is a private, non-profit organization supported by the generosity of its membership as well as by sponsorships and grants. Through creative programming and scholarship, the Museum provides the opportunity for people to encounter, engage and enjoy a diversity of art experiences. The Museum is open Wednesday through Sunday, 10 am to 5 pm, late on Thursdays until 8 pm. The galleries, Museum Store and Café Musée are closed on Mondays, Tuesdays and national holidays. Admission is FREE for members, $10 General Admission, $8 Student / Senior, $1 children 6 to 12 years and free for children 5 and under. Museum Membership starts at just $25.


    » Images & Citations

    Timothy J. Clark, <em>:00 AM Open</em>, 1975. Oil on canvas, 9 ¼ X 18 inches. Collection of Leslie and Betsy Roy.
    Timothy J. Clark, <em>:00 AM Open</em>, 1975. Oil on canvas, 9 ¼ X 18 inches. Collection of Leslie and Betsy Roy.

    Timothy J. Clark, <em>Study for “My Garage”</em>, 2001. Watercolor on paper, 30 x 22 inches. Collection of the Artist.
    Timothy J. Clark, <em>Study for “My Garage”</em>, 2001. Watercolor on paper, 30 x 22 inches. Collection of the Artist.

    » Events & Programs

    • Meet the Artist: Watercolorist Timothy J. Clark on Expressive Luminescence

      Friday January 28, 2011 / 12:00 pm – 12:30 pm

      Join renowned watercolor artist Timothy J. Clark for a special discussion of his work and his use of watercolor to describe light’s journey as it flows between inside and outside spaces, and between cause and effect, in the exhibition Expressive Luminescence on view through April 24. The Art Bite series is funded in part by Nevada Humanities.



  • HISTORIC QUILTS OF GEE'S BEND TO BE FEATURED AT THE NEVADA MUSEUM OF ART



    » Press Release

    January 30, 2010 - Distinctive and original works of art complete with compelling histories, A Survey of Gee's Bend Quilts will be on display at the Nevada Museum of Art, located in downtown Reno, Feb. 6 through April 11, 2010. Showcasing the creativity of a group of exceptional African-American women from a small, rural community in Alabama, A Survey of Gee's Bend Quilts offers a fascinating look into the lives of the quilters and their art while exploring the inspiration and future of this unique quilting tradition.

    Consisting of nearly 30 quilts, A Survey of Gee's Bend Quilts spans more than 70 years of quilting by the women of Gee's Bend, a community of just 700 residents located at a hairpin bend on the Alabama River. Comprised almost exclusively of descendants of the enslaved workers of Joseph Gee's cotton plantation, the area is surrounded on three sides by a river -- with only a single road in and out – leading to the development of a distinctive local culture and quilt aesthetic. The innovative pattern variations and abstract designs—all of which are rooted in tradition—are the quilters' own artistic expressions inspired by everyday events such as walking to the local store, visiting neighbors' homes and riding the bus.

    The quilts of Gee's Bend are made from everyday fabrics: corduroy, denim, cotton sheets and well-worn clothing. Most of the quilts are of the type known as piece, strip or patchwork, yet their vibrant color schemes and abstract compositions vary widely from the ordered regularity associated with traditional Western quiltmaking. A longstanding tradition passed down since pre-Civil War times, the quilts of Gee's Bend were once the products of thrift and necessity assembled from discarded fabric scraps and created to be piled on beds to keep families warm at night.

    Distinctive and original works of art complete with compelling histories, A Survey of Gee's Bend Quilts will be on display at the Nevada Museum of Art, located in downtown Reno, Feb. 6 through April 11, 2010. Showcasing the creativity of a group of exceptional African-American women from a small, rural community in Alabama, A Survey of Gee's Bend Quilts offers a fascinating look into the lives of the quilters and their art while exploring the inspiration and future of this unique quilting tradition.

    Consisting of nearly 30 quilts, A Survey of Gee's Bend Quilts spans more than 70 years of quilting by the women of Gee's Bend, a community of just 700 residents located at a hairpin bend on the Alabama River. Comprised almost exclusively of descendants of the enslaved workers of Joseph Gee's cotton plantation, the area is surrounded on three sides by a river -- with only a single road in and out – leading to the development of a distinctive local culture and quilt aesthetic. The innovative pattern variations and abstract designs—all of which are rooted in tradition—are the quilters' own artistic expressions inspired by everyday events such as walking to the local store, visiting neighbors' homes and riding the bus.

    The quilts of Gee's Bend are made from everyday fabrics: corduroy, denim, cotton sheets and well-worn clothing. Most of the quilts are of the type known as piece, strip or patchwork, yet their vibrant color schemes and abstract compositions vary widely from the ordered regularity associated with traditional Western quiltmaking. A longstanding tradition passed down since pre-Civil War times, the quilts of Gee's Bend were once the products of thrift and necessity assembled from discarded fabric scraps and created to be piled on beds to keep families warm at night.

    Major sponsorship provided by the Nevada Museum of Art Volunteers In Art.

    Media Sponsorship by KNPB Public Broadcasting.

    Additional funding provided by the Nevada Arts Council, a state agency, and the National Endowment for the Arts, a federal agency. Supported by Stimulus Funding from the Nevada Arts Council's SNAP Grant Program. Supported by Stimulus Funding from the Nevada Arts Council's SNAP Grant Program.

    A Survey of Gee's Bend Quilts will be exhibited February 6 through April 11, 2010 at the Nevada Museum of Art, Donald W. Reynolds Center for the Visual Arts, E. L. Wiegand Gallery located at 160 West Liberty Street in downtown Reno. The galleries are open Wednesday through Sunday. Cost: Museum members free; $10 adults; $8 students/seniors; $1 children 6 – 12; free for children under six. For more information, please call 775.329.3333 or visit www.nevadaart.org.

    GUIDED TOURS:
    Guided Tours for A Survey of Gee's Bend Quilts are free with admission on Thursday at 6pm (except First Thursdays) and Saturday and Sunday at 1pm. Space is available on a first-come, first-serve basis. Reservations are not needed. Spanish language tours can be arranged by calling 775.329.3333 ex. 253.

    » Images & Citations




    » Events & Programs

    • A Dialogue with the Gee's Bend Quilters

      Friday February 5, 2010 / 5:30 pm – 7:00 pm

      Don't miss this opportunity to meet two of the Gee's Bend quilters as they discuss the history, craft, and design of the Gee's Bend quilting tradition. Matt Arnett, Director of Exhibitions for Tinwood Media, the organization responsible for the Gee's Bend exhibitions of recent years, leads the dialogue and conversation.

    • Quilting Demonstration with the Quilters of Gee's Bend

      Saturday February 6, 2010 / 10:30 am – 12:00 pm

      Learn about the Gee's Bend quilting tradition from two Gee's Bend quilters as they demonstrate their quilting process and discuss their unique craft and style.

    • Telling Stories, Sharing Quilts: The Lore of the Local Quilt

      Saturday February 6, 2010 / 1:00 pm – 3:00 pm

      Join the Museum as local quilters share their stories and their art. Individual quilts will be displayed during the program and the quilters' stories documented. Want to participate? Upload your own story and a photograph of your quilt to our Flickr page: bit.ly/museumflickr.

    • Taste of Gee's Bend Dinner

      Thursday March 25, 2010 / 5:00 pm – 8:00 pm

      Celebrate the history and culture of Gee's Bend, Alabama, as Café Musée prepares a pre fixe dinner including the traditional southern tastes of Crisp Winter Greens, Double-Crusted Buttermilk Fried Chicken Breast with Corn and Goat Cheese Grits and Sweet Potato Pie with Vanilla Whipped Cream. Cost: $34.50 for Members / $44.50 for non-members, which includes admission to the Museum. For reservations please contact Cafe Musee at 775.332.1848 ex 104.

    • Julie Silber on A Survey of Gee's Bend Quilts

      Friday March 12, 2010 / 12:00 pm – 12:30 pm

      Renowned quilt expert Julie Silber investigates the complex intertwining of women's history and quilt making over the past forty years. These half-hour dialogues invite guests to experience an informal and intimate introduction to works in the galleries. The Art Bite series is supported, in part, by the Gabelli Foundation.



  • LOCAL ARTIST'S LATEST EXHIBITION "SWARMS" THE NEVADA MUSEUM OF ART



    » Press Release

    December 15, 2009 - Tuscarora, Nev. sees it fair share of insects each year as an annual invasion of Mormon crickets engulfs the small town, population 13. For resident and artist Elaine Parks, the infestation is an event she anticipates with both deference and dread, illustrated in her upcoming exhibition Swarm at the Nevada Museum of Art opening Saturday, Dec. 19, 2009.

    Consisting of over 1,000 larger-than-life-sized clay crickets, Swarm will encircle viewers much like the insects that take over Parks' town. Covering the entire floor of the intimate Small Works Gallery, the clay crickets will gather and climb the walls mimicking their counterparts' ascent of homes, highways and vegetation encountered along their annual march.

    A former associate of the Tuscarora Pottery School, Parks moved to Tuscarora in 2000 after receiving her MFA from California State University, Los Angeles in 1999. Parks soon discovered that the town, located about 50 miles north of Elko in the northeastern region of Nevada, is just one of many small towns across the American West that braces for the insects' visit each year. After hatching in the spring, the insects -- known formally as shield-backed katydids - spend all summer marching and eating their way through northern Nevada and western Utah until coming to a stop to lay their eggs and die.

    Swarm: Elaine Parks is on exhibition Dec. 19, 2009 through March 14, 2010 at the Nevada Museum of Art. Guided Tours are available free, with admission or membership, each Thursday (except First Thursday), at 6pm and Saturdays and Sundays at 1pm. Space is limited to a first-come, first-serve basis. Reservations are not needed. Spanish language tours are available by reservation at 775.329.3333 ex.253.

    ####
    The Nevada Museum of Art is a private, non-profit organization supported by the generosity of its membership as well as by sponsorships and grants. Through creative programming and scholarship, the Museum provides the opportunity for people to encounter, engage and enjoy a diversity of art experiences. The Museum is open Wednesday through Sunday, 10 am to 5 pm, late on Thursdays until 8 pm. The galleries, Museum Store and Café Musée are closed on Mondays, Tuesdays and national holidays.

    » Images & Citations

    Elaine Parks, <em>Crickets</em>, 2008-09, clay. Courtesy of the artist.
    Elaine Parks, Crickets, 2008-09, clay. Courtesy of the artist.


  • SNARLING DRAGONS AND MEDIEVAL MAIDENS INVADE THE MUSEUM



    » Press Release

    November 6, 2009 - The first museum to mount an exhibition of its kind, the Nevada Museum of Art presents Monsters and Maidens: Amphora Pottery of the Art Nouveau Era , opening Saturday, Nov. 14. Featuring snarling dragons and sea creatures, medieval maidens and lily pads, the exhibition is a rare opportunity to view the intricate and delightful works of the Amphora Pottery Company, created between 1892 and 1918. This first-ever museum exhibition of Amphora Pottery consists of approximately 20 pieces of porcelain and ceramic vessels including vases, planters and urns from the extensive collection of Dr. Byron Vreeland.

    "In the United States, the popularity of Amphora Pottery soared during the late nineteenth century as demand for decorative objects increased," said Ann M. Wolfe, Curator, Nevada Museum of Art. "It is surprising - given its popularity - that this unique and sometimes bizarre form of pottery remains relatively unknown today, except by a handful of collectors. We are excited to bring these more unusual and rarely seen works to the spotlight."

    Greatly influenced by the artistic and literary movements of the time, including Art Nouveau, Symbolist and Secessionist Art, Amphora Pottery came about due to a rare combination of historical and political events in late nineteenth century Bohemia. Following the country's inclusion into the Austro-Hungarian Empire, an influx of skilled German immigrants combined with Bohemia's Celtic origins, its thousand-year history, and rich culture fueled the creative synergy that resulted in the birth of the Amphora Pottery Company in 1860. Founded by Alfred Stellmacher in Turn-Teplitz, Bohemia (now the Czech Republic),, thousands of remarkably imaginative and delicately-crafted ceramic vessels were created. Renowned for their high quality, the works produced by the Company were frequently recognized at World Fairs and expositions resulting in increased access and popularity across the globe.

    Amphora Pottery is made using a die-or model-carved from clay and polished smooth. The die is then fired and used to create a plaster-of-Paris cast that is filled with refined clay and swirled to create a half-inch thick model. Once the inner model dries, the cast is removed and the clay is carved, glazed and fired. It is believed that the pieces in existence today are practically impossible to reproduce due to the prohibitive costs and time involved. Female faces were a popular motif used in Amphora pottery as many portrait pieces were influenced by themes and motifs from mythology, literature, and religion, portraying women as magical nymphs, dancers, and virgins. Insects and fantasy creatures, such as dragons, were also frequently portrayed.

    HIGHLIGHTED WORKS:
    Among the most sought-after of Amphora portrait pieces, the rare Spider Woman vase (pictured above), depicts a woman with closed eyes and long golden tresses, whose face is framed with a butterfly headdress, golden crown, and a spider web. Four opals have been affixed to further ornament the piece. The Bat Planter (pictured above), is one of the rarest and most ambitious objects made by the Amphora Company due to its large size and the intricacy of its design and ornamentation. Advertisements for the Bat Planter appeared in many German-language magazines around 1905. Only four examples of this piece are known to remain in the world-one of which is in the National Museum in Prague, Czechoslovakia. "Monsters" from the sea-such as squid, crab and octopus (pictured above),-were popular motifs for vases that were eagerly sought by collectors enamored with dragon-type imagery.

    Accompanying the exhibition is a detailed book by the same name, Monsters and Maidens: Amphora Pottery of the Art Nouveau Era , written by longtime collector and renowned Amphora Pottery Company researcher, Dr. Byron Vreeland. The text traces Amphora's history through Early Victorian forms to the Art Nouveau modern movement highlighted by 375 color plates, some of the finest Amphora creations ever made. In the book, Vreeland outlines the impact of the style on artists from across Europe, including Alfred and Eduard Stellmacher, Paul Dachsel, Ernst Wahliss, Alphonse Mucha, and Agathon Leonard. Monsters and Maidens: Amphora Pottery of the Art Nouveau Era is available for purchase in the Museum Store for $30 hardcover only.

    Monsters and Maidens: Amphora Pottery of the Art Nouveau Era will be on exhibit November 14 through January 17, 2010 at the Nevada Museum of Art, Donald W. Reynolds Center for the Visual Arts, E. L. Wiegand Gallery located at 160 West Liberty Street in downtown Reno. The galleries are open Wednesday through Sunday. Cost: Museum members free; $10 adults; $8 students/seniors; $1 children 6 - 12; free for children under six. For more information, please call 775.329.3333 or visit www.nevadaart.org.

    This exhibition features stunning examples of Amphora Pottery from the Southern California collection of Dr. Byron Vreeland. The Nevada Museum of Art is grateful to Dr. Vreeland for generously participating in this project and for lending the objects for this exhibition.

    ####
    The Nevada Museum of Art is a private, non-profit organization supported by the generosity of its membership as well as by sponsorships and grants. Through creative programming and scholarship, the Museum provides the opportunity for people to encounter, engage and enjoy a diversity of art experiences. The Museum is open Wednesday through Sunday, 10 am to 5 pm, late on Thursdays until 8 pm. The galleries, Museum Store and Café Musée are closed on Mondays, Tuesdays and national holidays.


  • E. L. WIEGAND FOUNDATION'S ARTE ITALIA TO PRESENT RAPHAEL'S: THE WOMAN WITH THE VEIL AT THE NEVADA MUSEUM OF ART



    » Press Release

    September 8, 2009 - Arte ITALIA, through its relationship with New York-based Foundation for Italian Art & Culture, announced today it will present a once-in-a-lifetime viewing of Raphael's masterpiece painting The Woman with the Veil in the E. L. Wiegand Gallery at the Nevada Museum of Art in Reno, NV from January 9 through March 21, 2010.

    Founded in Reno, NV and operated by the E. L. Wiegand Foundation, Arte ITALIA promotes the exploration and conservation of Italian culture, including innovative exhibitions of classic Italian art and culinary programs featuring renowned Italian chefs.

    Completed in 1516 - four years before Raphael died at age 37 - the single painting The Woman with the Veil ( La Velata in Italian ), depicts a woman wearing a veil and embodies some of the high Renaissance master's distinctive qualities: his control over pigment and color, and a serenity that contrasts with the style of his mentors and fellow icons of the era, notably Leonardo da Vinci and Michelangelo.

    "We are humbled and excited that the highly esteemed Foundation for Italian Art & Culture has made it possible for Arte ITALIA to present this 500-year-old magnificent masterpiece in Nevada for the first time," said Raymond C. Avansino, Jr., Chairman of the E. L. Wiegand Foundation and Arte ITALIA. "With the help of our friends at FIAC, Arte ITALIA is bringing an important Italian Renaissance treasure to Nevada schoolchildren, scholars, aspiring artists and the public. Unless you visit the Pitti Palace in Florence, Italy you would not have the opportunity to view this superb masterwork."

    David Walker, Executive Director and CEO of the Nevada Museum of Art, said, " Arte ITALIA and the Nevada Museum of Art have collaborated for months to make this a reality. Our relationship is a marriage of missions and we are thrilled to assist Arte ITALIA with bringing world class Italian art to Nevada. The opportunity to see Raphael's The Woman with the Veil is a gift of a lifetime to our community."

    Opening to the public on January 9, 2010, The Woman with the Veil depicts a serene woman looking intently at the viewer. It is believed that the model for the painting is the same woman depicted in other Raphael works including La Fornarina . Scholars have suggested that the woman, Margherita Luti, was Raphael's lover.

    This exhibition is presented by E.L. Wiegand Foundation's Arte ITALIA, organized by the Portland Art Museum and supported by an indemnity from the Federal Council on the Arts and the Humanities. This exhibition was made possible by the Foundation for Italian Art and Culture.

    About Raphael
    Raphael (1483-1520), also known as Raffaello Sanzio, was born in Urbino, Italy. His father, Giovanni Santi, was a painter and a poet. Raphael trained in his father's workshop and later in the workshop of the artist Pietro Perugino. In 1504 he began spending time and perhaps even resided in Florence, where he was influenced by the work of Leonardo da Vinci. Eventually, he moved to Rome where, under the patronage of Pope Julius II, he entered his most productive phase as an artist. He managed a large workshop of pupils and assistants, many of whom became well-known artists in their own right. Raphael's personal life was complex. He never married but was reputed to have had many relationships. In 1514 he became engaged to Maria Bibbiena, the niece of an influential Cardinal and Raphael's friend. The marriage never took place, and she died in 1520. Raphael lived a grand lifestyle in Rome and attained some status at court. It is believed that he died on his 37th birthday in 1520. He left a significant portion of his estate to his mistress Margherita Luti and he was buried in the Pantheon.

    About Foundation for Italian Art & Culture
    The Foundation for Italian Art & Culture is a non-profit, U.S. incorporated organization established in New York City in 2003. The Foundation's mission is to promote the knowledge and the appreciation of the Italian cultural and artistic traditions from the classical period to modern times in the United States and it works closely with the Italian Ministry of Culture to accomplish this mission. In addition to sponsoring its own programs and exhibitions, the Foundation acts as an intermediary between Italy and the United States to facilitate exchanges between American and Italian institutions.

    About Nevada Museum of Art
    Through creative programming and scholarship, the Nevada Museum of Art provides the opportunity for people to encounter, engage and enjoy a diversity of art experiences. Founded in 1931, the Museum is the oldest cultural institution in the state of Nevada. The Museum's feature exhibitions showcase national and international artists, while the permanent collection of nineteenth through twenty-first century art is divided into five focus collections linked by an overall emphasis on art and environment.

    Viewing Raphael: The Woman with the Veil
    Raphael: The Woman with the Veil will be presented at the E. L. Wiegand Gallery of the Nevada Museum of Art from January 9 through March 21, 2010. The Museum is open Wednesday through Sunday from 10am to 5pm and open on Thursdays until 8pm. Admission is $10 for adults, $8 for seniors and students, and $1 for children ages 6 to 12 years. Admission is free for Museum members. Additional information is available at www.nevadaart.org and www.arteitaliausa.com. In addition to its presentation in Reno, the painting will tour to the Portland Art Museum and the Milwaukee Art Museum before returning to Italy.

    LODGING PACKAGES AVAILABLE
    Lodging deals are available for this exhibition with one of Reno's most exciting hotels, the Silver Legacy Resort Casino. Click here for more information and to book your next vacation to Reno.
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    » Events & Programs

    • Opening Talk: David Alan Brown on Raphael

      Saturday January 9, 2010 / 11:00 am – 12:00 pm

      David Alan Brown, renowned Renaissance scholar and Curator of Italian Painting at the National Gallery of Art, presents the opening talk on Raphael's masterpiece, The Woman with the Veil. Don't miss this opportunity to learn about the Raphael's life from one the world's foremost scholars of the Renaissance period.

    • Dinner with the Girl

      Thursday January 28, 2010 / 5:00 pm – 8:00 pm

      Enjoy an intimate dinner inspired by the Marche/Urbino region of Italy, home of Raphael, during this unique evening celebrating Raphael: The Woman with the Veil. Prepared by Café Musée, the three course dinner includes admission to the Museum. Advance reservations are required at 775.332.1848 ex. 104.

    • Contour Portraits

      Sunday January 31, 2010 / 1:00 pm – 3:00 pm

      Explore Raphael: The Woman With the Veil and create a fun contour drawing of someone in your family. Outline your portrait in colored markers or pastels to make a special keepsake. One-hour sessions beginning at noon, 1 pm, 2 pm and 3 pm. Bring the entire family for this free, fun program featuring hands-on art projects and gallery activities for all ages.

    • Arte ITALIA DAY - FREE ADMISSION TO SEE RAPHAEL: THE WOMAN WITH THE VEIL

      Thursday February 25, 2010 / 10:00 am – 8:00 pm

      See Raphael: The Woman with the Veil for free during Arte ITALIA Day on Thursday, February 25 from 10 am to 8 pm. Trained docents will be on-hand to provide information from 2 to 8 pm. At 6pm, enjoy the sounds of vocal ensemble Reno Early Music as they perform Italian madrigal period music. Generously hosted by Arte ITALIA, admission is free to everyone on Thursday, February 25, 2010 only.

    • Italy in the Age of Raphael

      Friday February 12, 2010 / 12:00 pm – 12:30 pm

      Join UNR professor of European History Kevin Stevens as he guides visitors through a fascinating exploration of Italian life and culture in Raphael's time. These half-hour dialogues invite guests to experience an informal and intimate introduction to works in the galleries. The Art Bite series is supported, in part, by the Gabelli Foundation.

    • Framing in the Sixteenth Century

      Friday February 19, 2010 / 12:00 pm – 12:30 pm

      Discover the ornate, gold-gilt Renaissance frame of The Woman with the Veil with master framemaker Greg Drinkwine as he leads an intimate discussion of frames from the Renaissance, considered objects of art unto themselves. These half-hour dialogues invite guests to experience an informal and intimate introduction to works in the galleries. The Art Bite series is supported, in part, by the Gabelli Foundation.