William Eggleston
Los Alamos

Signaling the Nevada Museum of Art’s ongoing commitment to contemporary photography, William Eggleston: Los Alamos will feature seventy-five of the iconic American artist’s vivid color images taken in the Mississippi Delta, New Orleans, Las Vegas, Los Alamos, and Los Angeles between 1965 and 1974.

His compelling photographs capture the unexpected beauty of parked cars, people, billboards, and abandoned storefronts across the American landscape. Eggleston titled the series Los Alamos, after the national laboratory in New Mexico where atomic weapons were developed.

Born in 1939 in Memphis, Tennessee, Eggleston is largely credited with legitimizing color photography as a fine art form. In 1976 the Museum of Modern Art in New York exhibited Eggleston’s photographs in a groundbreaking solo exhibition—the first fine-art exhibition of color photography almost a century after the introduction of color film.

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WIlliam Eggleston, Untitled (Supermarket boy with carts) from the Los Alamos portfolio, 1965 - 74, 1965 - 74. Dye-transfer print, 20 x 16 inches. © Eggleston Artistic Trust, Courtesy Cheim & Read, New York, Collection of Randi and Bob Fisher.

Los Alamos