Center for Art + Environment Blog

September 27, 2011   |   William L. Fox

Travels in Australia: Paruku — Part 3 of 6

Travels in Australia: Paruku

Standing in the open air studio of Devid Leece at our Lake Gregory camp, and contemplating his paintings. Photo by John Carty.

Standing in the open air studio of Devid Leece at our Lake Gregory camp, and contemplating his paintings. Photo by John Carty.

Standing in the open air studio of Devid Leece at our Lake Gregory camp, and contemplating his paintings. Photo by John Carty.

The Paruku Project out at Lake Gregory in Western Australia wasn’t just about Indigenous people painting, but also work by the artists Kim Mahood, Mandy Martin, and David Leece. David, who is known more for being one of Melbourne’s leading architects and photographers, worked on a series that captured two views of the same scene on a single canvas, one horizon stacked above the other, a cognitive record of how we never see the same scene twice in an identical manner. Mandy, who is the definitive Australian painter of the romantic sublime, used various ground earthen pigments and acrylic to built up complex 5-part field sketches. They’re complete works in and of themselves, but also notes toward the much larger oil paintings she’ll do back in the studio.
Kim, daughter of a Tanami rancher, grew up in the region and was raised in part by Aboriginal people; she has a distinctly different and deeper relationship with the community here, living and working in Mulan for three months out of the year. Since 2007 she’s been painting a set of very large canvases that are at first simple topographical maps of the land. But the ochre-colored canvases showing the location of the lake and creeks and dunes are just the start. The community women then sit with her, tell stories, and paint information into the work. One map might be a history of local events, another the extent of water from year to year, and a recent one documents burn scars where fire has swept through the spinifex and grasslands during the last five years. The maps are both works of art, but also documents that can help influence politics and policies.

When you look at the story paintings that the Mulan women are doing, the work by the visiting artists, and Kim’s maps, you begin to get an inkling of the layers involved both in landscape as a human construct, but also how deep here those physical layers extend.

Kim Mahood and the artists of Mulan, Fire Map, 2007-2011. Photo by John Carty

Kim Mahood and the artists of Mulan, Fire Map, 2007-2011. Photo by John Carty


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