Center for Art + Environment Blog

October 16, 2011   |   William L. Fox

Travels in Australia: Paruku — Part 5 of 6

Travels in Australia: Paruku

Hanson Pye and others laying out the painting on the second day. Photo by John Carty.

Chris Curran examining the Parnkupirti Creek painting at the end of the first day’s work. Photo by John Carty.

Chris Curran examining the Parnkupirti Creek painting at the end of the first day’s work. Photo by John Carty.

The men’s painting of the dingo tracks along Parnkupirti Creek took days. At first, each of the five artists picked up one of the five panels and sat apart, painting his own style onto the canvas. By the end of the first day the panels were beginning to come alive with rich patterned color–but none of the panels matched. Dingo tracks were painted along Kim’s creekbed, and ended in a pool of blue pigment painted by Hanson to represent where the two dogs went to ground.
On the second morning the men took the five panels back down into the creekbed, along the way torching some of the spinifex. It was done casually with a tossed match, which astonished me, coming from a state where out-of-control wildfires regularly consume thousands of square acres. But, despite the fierce afternoon winds that rose, the fires stayed contained within a few square yards, a testament to the wisdom of burning country on a regular basis, and a land management tool that’s been used on the continent for at least fifty thousand years.

Hanson’s brother Cyril took each of the panels and completely covered over the white creek that Kim had painted across them with thick black paint. Then he repainted them again with white, and completely redid the dingo tracks in a manner that was consistent, thus starting to reinforce how the individual pieces would jell into a single story and work of art.

As I was sitting crosslegged on the ground nearby, taking notes about the progress of the painting, I also kept staring at the bank of the creek opposite me, which Bowler had studied and sketched. A hundred thousand years of lakeshore sediments was exposed, and the men were painting a story that was so old it was almost geological in its origins.

Hanson Pye and others laying out the painting on the second day. Photo by John Carty.

Hanson Pye and others laying out the painting on the second day. Photo by John Carty.


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