Center for Art + Environment Blog

  • Fractured: North Dakota's Oil Boom

    Faces and Stories

    February 14, 2013   |   By Terry Evans & Elizabeth Farnsworth

    It has been a slow and sometimes frustrating process to figure out how to photograph this huge story of upheaval and contradictions on the North Dakota prairie. I have wanted my pictures to be more than reportage. I’ve wanted them to contain the poetry and drama of the layers of history, the expeditions of Lewis... View Post

  • Fractured: North Dakota's Oil Boom

    The High Broken Ash — Part I

    February 14, 2013   |   By Terry Evans & Elizabeth Farnsworth

    June 2011 Before leaving for our first trip to Williston, epicenter of the North Dakota oil boom, I find a book-length poem by Thomas McGrath, “Letter to an Imaginary Friend,” to use as a charm against friends and family who disparage the state as boring, fly-over country. “There’s nothing up there,” some have said. “Why... View Post

  • Fractured: North Dakota's Oil Boom

    Dakota is Everywhere

    February 7, 2013   |   By Terry Evans & Elizabeth Farnsworth

    November 2012 Fog blankets Williston this morning as wet snow falls. Through a dirty hotel window I can just make out heavy trucks traveling east and west, even in this weather, to service oil wells along Highway 2. The four lane strip ties together much of the Williston Basin, a 300,000 square mile depression that... View Post

  • Excavating Carbon Sink: Meditations on Art Removal

    December 6, 2012   |   By Michaela Rife

    ‘Arguments,’ such as they are, given in support of the removal of public art in our time range from political to aesthetic to moral. In some cases, as in the April 2003 toppling of Sadam Hussein’s Baghdad statue, the removal is documented as a cause célèbres. In others, as in the recent removal of disgraced... View Post

  • Visits in Tasmania

    Travels in Tasmania — Part 3 of 3

    August 2, 2012   |   By William L. Fox

    Tasmania’s Museum of Old and New Art (MONA) opened in 2011 to both raves and brickbats. Founded by mathematician and world-class gambler David Walsh, it at first appeared to house one man’s eccentric obsessions from old coins to works by Anselm Kiefer. Critics lambasted it as a monument to a global civilization in decline, as... View Post

  • Visits in Tasmania

    Travels in Tasmania — Part 2 of 3

    July 26, 2012   |   By William L. Fox

    The Tasmanian Museum and Art Gallery (TMAG), established in 1843, lives in a handsome sandstone building just uphill from the Hobart harbor, which at the moment has in port one of the few research ships that sails regularly to the Antarctic. The large orange Aurora Australis is an icebreaker that many Australian artists have journeyed... View Post

  • Visits in Tasmania

    Travels in Tasmania — Part 1 of 3

    July 17, 2012   |   By William L. Fox

    I’m in central Tasmania attending a conference about “Imaging Nature,” which is being held at an arts-and-craft resort high in the mountains. The Tarraleah Lodge and resort was originally the village for workers constructing one of the larger hydroelectric projects in the state, and my room faces out into a eucalyptus forest that is bordered... View Post

  • Across Time and Space

    Michael Heizer — Across Time and Space

    June 15, 2012   |   By William L. Fox

    In front of Reno’s downtown Bruce R. Thompson Federal Courthouse — and only a block from the Nevada Museum of Art — is the steel version of Michael Heizer’s Perforated Object. Created in 1996, the 27-foot-long sculpture is 9 feet 9 inches tall and 3 feet 4 inches wide. Its Michael Heizer’s radically re-sized version... View Post

  • William Fox on Metabolic Studio in Lone Pine

    Metabolic Studio in Lone Pine — Part 4 of 4

    May 24, 2012   |   By William L. Fox

    In the afternoon following the conversation at De La Coer Ranch, Janet Driggs from Metabolic Studio takes Matt Coolidge and me to the old Pittsburgh Plate Glass works on the edge of Owens Lake. I’ve driven by the multiple silos and sheet metal factory buildings for years, and it’s a wish come true to clamber... View Post

  • William Fox on Metabolic Studio in Lone Pine

    Metabolic Studio in Lone Pine — Part 3 of 4

    May 3, 2012   |   By William L. Fox

    The nature of social practice was never more evident than this morning, sitting in the upper reaches of the De La Cour Ranch some 1500 feet above the Owens Dry Lake. Lauren Bon and her studio had gathered together some of the major local food producers, many of whom use soil produced at the ranch... View Post