The Way We Live
American Indian Art of the Great Basin and the Sierra Nevada

This exhibition surveys contemporary art made by American Indians in the Great Basin and Sierra Nevada region. In January 2011, the Nevada Museum of Art, in association with the Pyramid Lake Museum/Visitors Center in Nixon, Nevada, issued a call for artists to submit works addressing issues relating to concepts of the changing environment. The purpose of the project is to encourage the creation of new artworks in a range of media.

The 400,000-square mile-region known as the Great Basin is the largest watershed in North America which does not drain to an ocean.

Featuring contemporary artworks by Dugan Aguilar, Ben Aleck, Melvin J. Brown, Farrell Cunningham, Black Eagle, Billy Hawk Enos, Donna Featherstone, Micqaela Jones-Crouch, Jean LaMarr, Frank LaPena, Judith Lowry, Jack Malotte, Melissa Melero, Ramon Murillo, Clayton B. Sampson, Paul Stone, Ray Valdez and Alan Wallace.

Artists were encouraged to consider the following themes: a) ecology, ecosystems, and natural environments, b) animals, animal life and the environment, c) land use, the built environment, conflict, and politics; d) spiritual worldviews and the environment; e) changing relationships to the environment.

Exhibition sponsorship provided by Barrick Gold of North America and the National Endowment for the Arts. Premiere and Program sponsorship provided by the Charles Redd Center for Western Studies with additional funding provided by The Nevada Arts Council, a state agency. Additional program support provided by the Eldorado Hotel Casino.

Micqaela Jones, Granddaughters Ride of Futility, 2012. Mixed media, 36” x 48”. Courtesy of the artist. Melissa Melero, Tommo (Winter), 2012. Mixed media with willow on canvas, 50” x 50”. Courtesy of the artist.